The House

CBC Radio's The House: America's man in Ottawa

On this week’s show: U.S. Ambassador David Cohen discusses the state of the Canadian-American relationship and his country’s expectations on defence spending. Former tech executive Jim Balsillie examines Canada’s approach to innovation and its new budget promises. Plus — two journalists break down the state of the Conservative leadership race and former foreign affairs minister Pierre Pettigrew offers his take on France’s presidential election.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

U.S. Ambassador David Cohen, seen here in December 2021, sits down with host Chris Hall to discuss his country's expectations on defence spending. (Fred Chartrand/CP)
U.S. Ambassador David Cohen discusses the state of the Canadian-American relationship and his country’s expectations on defence spending. Former tech executive Jim Balsillie examines Canada’s approach to innovation and its new budget promises. Plus — two journalists break down the state of the Conservative leadership race and former foreign affairs minister Pierre Pettigrew offers his take on France’s presidential election.

U.S. ambassador says Canada should make Arctic defence a 'national priority'

The United States is Canada's next-door neighbour, biggest trading partner and closest friend. But that relationship isn't without strain — or irritants. When it comes to navigating trade barriers or discussing increases to defence spending, it's up to U.S. Ambassador David Cohen to represent the Americans' view.

Now five months into the job, Ambassador Cohen sits down with host Chris Hall at the U.S. Embassy in downtown Ottawa to reflect on the state of the two countries' relationship and the next steps he expects on NORAD modernization, Arctic defence and integrated supply chains.

U.S. Ambassador David Cohen sits down with host Chris Hall to reflect on the state of the Canada-U.S. relationship and next steps on NORAD modernization, Arctic defence and integrated supply chains.

Why Canadian companies need more support for innovation

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland's budget pledges $3 billion in new funding for Canadian innovation and pitches the creation of a new investment agency. Jim Balsillie, founder of the Centre for International Governance Innovation and former co-CEO of Research in Motion — the Canadian company that introduced the BlackBerry and smartphones to the world — said he feels the feds are pursuing "old approaches for a bygone era."

He joins host Chris Hall to lay out the measures he thinks are needed to help Canada thrive in a competitive high-tech world. Plus, Armen Bakirtzian, CEO and co-founder of Intellijoint Surgical, one of the fastest growing tech companies in Canada, puts into context some of the challenges facing homegrown startups today.

Former tech executive Jim Balsillie examines federal support for innovation in the budget and a homegrown tech CEO contextualizes some of the challenges facing companies today.

Crowds versus coffee chats

The race to become the next Conservative leader has yielded a field of candidates divided by both ideology and tactics. While Pierre Poilievre, the presumed front-runner, has filled huge public rallies with thousands of supporters, rivals like Jean Charest are banking on a more personal approach. 

About six weeks after the race started in earnest, what can be gleaned from the policy proposals and electioneering tactics put forward by the various camps? CBC senior reporter Hannah Thibedeau and Maclean's Ottawa bureau chief Shannon Proudfoot join the program to discuss.

CBC senior reporter Hannah Thibedeau and Maclean’s Ottawa bureau chief Shannon Proudfoot discuss how diverging policy decisions and campaign tactics are shaping the race to become the next leader of the Conservatives.

Liberté, égalité … divisée?

French President Emmanuel Macron and far-right rival Marine Le Pen are headed to a rematch this weekend, with voters set to choose once more between two very different leaders in a runoff vote.

The vote is close, raising questions about how divided France is and how sympathetic citizens are to Le Pen's anti-immigration views and her softer stance on Russia. Former minister of foreign affairs Pierre Pettigrew sits down to discuss the political dynamics at play in one of Canada's closest allies.

Former minister of foreign affairs Pierre Pettigrew offers his take on the political dynamics and divisions at play in France as it heads to a presidential election this Sunday.

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