The House

CBC Radio's The House: Canada to the defence

On this week’s show: Ukrainian MP Ivanna Klympush-Tsintsadze details the pleas her colleagues have made to the PM for more support. CBC’s Vassy Kapelos reports on the refugee crisis unfolding on the ground in Poland. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh lays out his party’s budget expectations for investments in health care and housing. Plus — ahead of next week’s budget, a dive into what’s on the shopping list for the military and a look at Canada’s fiscal capacity.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

A U.S. F-35 fighter jet flies over the Eifel Mountains near Spangdahlem, Germany on Feb. 23, 2022. Canada has launched negotiations to buy 88 of the planes. (Harald Tittel/Associated Press)
On this week’s show: Ukrainian MP Ivanna Klympush-Tsintsadze details the pleas her colleagues have made to the PM for more support. CBC’s Vassy Kapelos reports on the refugee crisis unfolding on the ground in Poland. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh lays out his party’s budget expectations for investments in health care and housing. Plus — ahead of next week’s budget, a dive into what’s on the shopping list for the military and a look at Canada’s fiscal capacity.

Ukrainian MPs bring their country's pleas to Parliament Hill

Ukrainian politicians met face-to-face with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau this week to ask directly for more military and financial support for their country.

Ivanna Klympush-Tsintsadze, an MP with the European Solidarity Party and Ukraine's former deputy prime minister for European and Euro-Atlantic integration, was part of the group. She tells The House why she thinks the visit could make a difference.

Plus, Power & Politics host Vassy Kapelos joins the show with highlights from her coverage of the refugee crisis in Poland.

Ukrainian MP Ivanna Klympush-Tsintsadze details her visit this week with the prime minister and what she hopes it could achieve, and CBC’s Vassy Kapelos reports on the refugee crisis unfolding on the ground in Poland.

The plea for two per cent

This week, the federal government said it will start negotiations to buy 88 F-35 fighter jets — a move the procurement minister called the "most significant investment" in the air force in 30 years. 

The Liberal government has hinted at a boost to military spending in next week's budget. But will that spending go beyond the F-35 purchase announced this week? Will Canada push its military spending to two per cent of GDP, meeting NATO's long-established benchmark?

The House's senior producer Jennifer Chevalier spoke to defence experts Dave Perry, Andrea Charron, Kim Richard Nossal and retired lieutenant general Andrew Leslie to hear their shopping list for the Canadian military.

Senior producer Jennifer Chevalier speaks to defence experts Dave Perry, Andrea Charron, Kim Richard Nossal and retired Lt.-Gen. Andrew Leslie to hear their shopping list for the Canadian military ahead of next week’s federal budget.

Jagmeet Singh lays out his expectations for the budget

Next week's federal budget will be the first test of the Liberal-NDP accord that commits both parties to avoiding an election before 2025. 

What leverage does the NDP now have to ensure its priorities — such as universal dental care and massive new investment in affordable housing — are reflected in the Liberal government's agenda? Host Chris Hall sits down with NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh on Parliament Hill.

Host Chris Hall sits down with NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh on Parliament Hill to talk about the first test of the Liberal-NDP accord: the upcoming federal budget.

Another big budget

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland is set to be a big spender again next week. The new federal budget is expected to offer major new investments in social programs and the fight against climate change — and could include new money for defence. 

So how would those spending commitments work within Canada's fiscal capacity, and what would they say about the government's political priorities? Two journalists join The House to break it all down: Theo Argitis, Bloomberg's Ottawa bureau chief, and Marieke Walsh, parliamentary reporter with The Globe and Mail.

Bloomberg Ottawa bureau chief Theo Argitis and Globe and Mail reporter Marieke Walsh look ahead to issues of fiscal capacity and political priorities in the upcoming federal budget.

Driving down emissions in Canada's second highest-polluting sector

The federal government tabled its first-ever emissions reduction plan this week, mapping out how key sectors like oil and gas, agriculture and transportation can reduce carbon pollution over the next eight years.

While the oil and gas sector is the largest emitter, transportation comes in a close second — accounting for a quarter of all emissions in Canada. Now, the government wants to drive down pollution from trucks and cars to 11 per cent below 2005 levels by the end of the decade.

Yunsu Park, director of engineering with the North American Council for Freight Efficiency, joins The House to discuss the ambitious target and its impact on the trucking industry.

Yunsu Park, director of engineering with the North American Council for Freight Efficiency, examines the government’s drive to reduce emissions in the transportation sector.

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now