The Current

Doctors face uncharted territory with doctor assisted suicide ruling

With Friday's Supreme Court Ruling allowing doctor-assisted suicide under certain conditions, doctors across the country will soon be navigating new legal and ethical territory. Today, we hear from three doctors on assisted dying....
With Friday's Supreme Court Ruling allowing doctor-assisted suicide under certain conditions, doctors across the country will soon be navigating new legal and ethical territory. Today, we hear from three doctors on assisted dying. 

This ruling will reduce suffering. It will allow people to actually live longer because they will have the peace of mind that they will not have a horrible death.Steven Fletcher, Conservative MP

Steven Fletcher is among those applauding the Supreme Court's landmark ruling last Friday, which paves the way for physician-assisted suicide in Canada. The Conservative MP had introduced his own private members bill seeking to change the law.

And now the highest court in the land has spoken -- and given federal and provincial governments one year to craft new legislation.

Whatever they come up with, the law will have to acknowledge that competent adults enduring intolerable suffering from irrecoverable medical conditions, will have the right to ask a doctor to help them end their life. It will lead to a lot of weighty conversations inside Canadian families ... And it will mean an entirely new dimension in the relationship between physicians and patients.

So, as lawmakers get to work on changing the books, we brought together three doctors to see how they're preparing themselves.


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This segment was produced by The Current's Kristin Nelson, Lara O'Brien and Sujata Berry.

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