The Current

The father of Hong Kong's democracy movement vows to fight for the rest of his life

Martin Lee is affectionately known as the father of Hong Kong democracy. As its streets remain choked with resentful protestors, Mr. Lee joins us to explain what the people want, and what they're likely to get....
Martin Lee is affectionately known as the father of Hong Kong democracy. As its streets remain choked with resentful protestors, Mr. Lee joins us to explain what the people want, and what they're likely to get.
Democracy is the destiny of all nations.Martin Lee, founding member of the Hong Kong Democratic Party

After two weeks of relative restraint, Hong Kong police went on the offensive. Shortly before dawn on Wednesday, riot police charged pro-democracy protesters, using batons and pepper spray to push them from an area near the government's headquarters.

Video of police kicking a handcuffed protester circulated widely, fueling anger and outrage. Hong Kong's Chief Executive, Leung Chun-ying, renewed his offer to speak with the protesters. But, he's ruled out compromise on their key demand--they want Beijing to stop insisting only its approved candidates may run for office in Hong Kong.

Nearly three weeks into the stand-off, there seem to be fewer acceptable ways out for either side. Last night, police were back raiding protester's camps and taking down barricades.

Martin Lee is the founding member of the Hong Kong Democratic Party and a long-time member of the Hong Kong Legislative Council. He also sat on the committee that drafted the Hong Kong Basic Law, which serves as the region's de-facto constitution. He joined us from Hong Kong.

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This segment was produced by The Current's Gord Westmacott.

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