Topic: books

The power of logic: How math can help you win your next argument

What's the secret to winning arguments in a world of divisive politics? According to the author of The Art of Logic in an Illogical World, the answer is math.

Laws to suppress black vote in U.S. are being drafted with 'horrific efficiency,' says author

In her new book, author and academic Carol Anderson explores the history of voter suppression in the U.S., and argues that a resurgence of those tactics affected the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Trump's adoption of steel tariffs showed 'absence of a reasonable logical process,' Bob Woodward says

U.S. President Donald Trump imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum from Canada and other countries without even warning members of his administration, veteran Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward said in an interview with CBC's The Current.

How Mike Pence plans to become the next U.S. president: author

What would a Mike Pence presidency look like? Journalist Peter Eisner, co-author of The The Shadow President: The Truth About Mike Pence, delves into the vice-president's plan toward becoming the next U.S. president.

Lea Garofalo was killed by her Mafia family. Now she's the face of anti-mob protests

Alex Perry's new book looks at the women who are fighting to bring down the Mafia, and inspiring people across Italy to say enough is enough.

How brain cancer gave a neuroscientist insight into mental illness

After a career studying brains, neuroscientist Barbara K. Lipska developed a whole new understanding of mental illness when brain cancer caused her to lose her mind.

How a search for the world's best coffee led to Yemen in the midst of civil war

What lengths would you go to for the perfect cup of coffee? For Mokhtar Alkhanshali his quest took him to Yemen where the daunting hikes up the highland mountains were the least of his challenges during the civil war.

From isolated homeschooling to a PhD from Cambridge: How Tara Westover was saved by her education

Tara Westover grew up with isolationist parents who didn't trust the government and gave her an erratic homeschooling. But getting an education — culminating in a PhD from Cambridge — helped her break out.

There's underlying sexism when the romance genre is criticized, novelists say

The dismissal and judgment of romance novels seem a common trope for literary types. But romance authors argue some criticism is rife with sexism and the genre, and readers, deserve a lot more respect.

Trump is creating a world of empty embassies and risking global stability, says Ronan Farrow

Ronan Farrow's new book argues that the U.S. State Department is being gutted to the point where American influence in the world is at risk.

Lawrence Wright on why Texas matters to America's future

When journalist Lawrence Wright searched for the soul of Texas, he found his home state to be a powerhouse under the radar that needs to be reckoned with.

How a hunger for a wider world led Kate Harris to cycle the Silk Road

On a mission to seek 'the world's wildness,' Kate Harris and her friend Mel biked 10,000 km along the Silk Road. Throughout her travels, she learned how the landscape can teach us a lot about human fragility.

Why you should be happy you're alive right now

In his new book, Steven Pinker argues that our culture's focus on negativity blinds us from humanity's achievements. The facts support optimism, he says, and should embolden us to solve whatever problems our society faces.

Why a Swiss adventurer left the Western world to join a nomadic Indigenous community

Journalist Carl Hoffman follows two Western adventurers in his new book The Last Wild Men of Borneo, and reveals much about the forces shaping the island today.

U.S. 'ignored tips about Russian plot to undermine elections'

The U.S. has been aware of a Russian plot for several years, claim journalists Michael Isikoff and David Corn in a new book, but options to fight back have been limited.