The Current

Undecided voters on why they're stuck between the parties

They're not Pollsters. They're not Pundits. They're a Panel of the Perplexed. As the federal election campaign heats up, party leaders are pulling out all the stops in the tightest three-way race in Canadian history. We're talking to undecided voters to tell us what issues could capture their ballots.
50% of voters are still willing to consider any of two, three or more parties. Some say unconfirmed voters will determine the outcome of this election. (Keith Ivey, Flickr cc)
Listen27:02

This is my first sign that I'm putting out, my NDP sign. And they are going to say 'OK, Jane's voting NDP'. But then two days from now they are going to see a Liberal sign here. And they are going to say, 'What's going on I thought Jane was voting NDP?' And this is my little joke because everybody's going back and forth, back and forth and I just think everyone will get a chuckle over this in the neighbourhood.- Undecided Voter, Jane Davis
Are you an undecided voter like Jane Davis? What issue could swing your vote? (Mary Lynk/CBC)

Halifax resident Jane Davis may get more nodding heads than chuckles in response to her rotating lawn signs. That's because about half of the country is in a similar conundrum.

According to a Nanos Research poll published last week, fifty per cent of Canadian voters say they are still willing to consider any of two, three, or more parties in the upcoming federal election.  

With Canada facing its tightest three-way race in historyand half of Canadians undecided, we wanted to hear from voters who need convincing about the issues that will shape their choice on October 19th. 

  • Caleb Behn is a 33-year-old Lands manager for West Moberly First Nations, and Executive Director for Keepers of the Water. He lives in Invermere, B.C.
  • Donna Bryant is a 63-year-old mother of four and home-maker in Vancouver.
  • Sean McEvoy is a 23-year-old psychology student. He was in Stellarton, Nova Scotia. 
     

If you want more non-partisan information on which party's platform is most closely aligned with your views... try CBC's Vote Compass tool at cbcnews.ca/VoteCompass.

For more insight on undecided Canadian voters, we were joined by Shachi Kurl. She is senior vice president at Angus Reid Institute -- a not-for-profit non-partisan research and polling organization in Vancouver. 
 

Are you an undecided voter? What would it take to help you make up your mind? 

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This segment was produced by The Current's Josh Bloch and Sarah Grant.