The Current

ENCORE: Artist Roy Henry Vickers on making art, beating addiction and turning 70

The B.C. artist, carver, designer and storyteller, Roy Henry Vickers, explains how art helped him beat a life-threatening addiction, and says he's now eager to create and share Aboriginal stories.
B.C. artist Roy Henry Vickers (Robert “Lucky" Budd)
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I became an artist — colorblind and all.- Roy Henry Vickers

British Columbian Roy Henry Vickers has work displayed in galleries and museums around the world. He is an artist, carver, designer and storyteller. 

'There were people who convinced me that it was possible to make my life a work of art. So I've been working at that ever since.' - Roy Henry Vickers
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      Having recovered from addictions and overcome significant challenges, including colour blindness, Roy Henry Vickers' life and art are full of strength and hope. 

      In 1992, my most successful year as an artist, the most money I had ever made - I was close to the end of my life and just feeling like I was a failure, totally. And there were some people who convinced me that it was possible to make my life a work of art. So I've been working at that ever since.-Roy Henry Vickers

      The Aboriginal artist joined The Current's Anna Maria Tremonti in June to share his story, and discuss his new book Peace Dancer.

      I learned that I was a beautiful person, that I could stand in the strength and the truth and the beauty that my ancestors have given me, and be the person that I was meant to be in this world.- Roy Henry Vickers


      This segment was produced by The Current's Liz Hoath