The Current

The Current for November 21, 2018

Today on The Current: As the labour dispute at Canada Post rumbles on, one worker worries health and safety concerns won't be addressed; forty years after the Jonestown massacre, a survivor reflects on how looking death in the eye has affected her life; and Saskatchewan has introduced legislation allowing police to warn someone if their partner has a violent past — will it save lives?
(CBC)

Full Episode Transcript

Today on The Current:

  • The federal government is prepared to table back-to-work legislation to end the Canada Post labour dispute, after weeks of rotating walkouts that have created a backlog of over a million pieces of undelivered mail. We talk to a mail carrier who's worried that fears about workplace health and safety won't be addressed, and look at what's next for the Crown corporation.
  • Jackie Speier was shot five times as she tried to help defectors leave the Jonestown commune in Guyana in 1978. She survived, but that same night, more than 900 people died after drinking a fruit drink laced with cyanide, under the instruction of cult leader Jim Jones. At the 40th anniversary of the massacre, Speier reflects on the effect that looking death in the eye has had on her life.
  • Saskatchewan has introduced legislation allowing police to warn someone if their partner has a violent past. We hear from a father who advocated for this type of protection in the U.K. after his daughter was murdered, and two experts discuss how the law could be implemented across Canada.

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