The Current

Doctor develops alternative rite of passage without female genital mutilation

Communities in Africa are slowly embracing the idea of an alternative rite of passage without female genital mutilation thanks to Dr. Githinji Gitahi and his organization. He says the new method doesn't put girls' emotional and physical health at risk.
Amref Health Africa is helping communities in countries such as Kenya, Ethiopia and Tanzania to break free of female genital mutilation, providing a safe alternative rite of passage into womanhood. (Amref Health Africa)
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Female genital mutilation — a practice which alters or injures female genitalia as a rite of passage to womanhood for young girls — has been globally condemned as a human rights violation.

In Canada FGM is illegal but in many parts of the world the practice continues to exist.

Three million girls in Africa are at risk of undergoing Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) every year.

Amref Health Africa is helping communities in countries such as Kenya, Ethiopia and Tanzania to break free of this cultural ritual by developing an alternative approach that does not put girls at risk, both emotionally and physically. The program has saved an estimated 8,000 girls from the painful practice.

The Current spoke to Dr. Githinji Gitahi, the CEO of Amref Health Africa on how communities are embracing this new idea.
 

This segment was produced by The Current's Sarah Grant.