The Current

The Current for March 13, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at the report on the 2014 death of Tina Fontaine, and ask if it goes far enough to protect vulnerable Indigenous youth; plus, we look at an attempt to bring Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to the International Criminal Court over the horrors of the country's civil war; also, what can the multimillion-dollar U.S. college admissions scam tell us about privilege in America?; and a doctor explains why the cost of getting a lung transplant in Canada is so high that some patients are choosing death.
The CBC's Piya Chattopadhyay guest hosts The Current. (CBC)
Listen to the full episode1:14:28

Today on The Current

  • On Tuesday, Manitoba's Advocate for Children and Youth Daphne Penrose released her report into the 2014 death of Tina Fontaine. We ask if its recommendations go far enough to protect vulnerable Indigenous youth, and hear from one expert who says First Nations need more control in those efforts.
  • A group of Syrian refugees is attempting to bring President Bashar al-Assad to the International Criminal Court, but some experts say the case is too weak to succeed. We discuss its chances, and whether just the attempt is a path to healing.
  • U.S. federal prosecutors charged 50 people on Tuesday in connection to a multimillion-dollar scam to get their children into the most elite colleges. What does the case tell us about privilege in America?
  • Patients in need of a lung transplant in Atlantic Canada need to move to Toronto for care, but the cost of that move is so high that some patients are choosing death over the debt. We speak to a doctor about the heartbreaking conversations she has with patients, and what should be done about it.

Full Episode Transcript