The Current

The Current for July 19, 2019

Today on The Current: A number of cities across Canada are divided over how to tackle the electric scooter. We speak to three experts about whether the challenges of this dockless transportation outweigh the benefits. Next, the new remake of The Lion King roars into theatres, but an author argues it's a fascist storyline. Then, primatologist Frans de Waal says most animals have emotions as complex as humans.
David Common is guest host of The Current. (CBC)
Listen to the full episode1:12:58

Today on The Current:

  • A number of cities across Canada are divided over how to tackle the electric scooter. The transportation method has already rolled into major metropolitan areas throughout the United States, along with a focus on enforcement and safety. We speak to three experts about whether the challenges of this dockless transportation overshadow the benefits.
  • The remake of The Lion King roared into theatres on Friday. Dan Hassler-Forest, a professor of media studies and English literature at Utrecht University, says the beloved tale is a parable of fascism, which "paints a picture of a society in which power is decided biologically."
  • A new CBC Podcast, The Pit, investigates what led to the 2015 disappearance of a Saskatchewan woman, Sheree Fertuck, whose body still hasn't be found. Co-host Alicia Bridges tells us the gravel pit where her semi-truck was found could still hold clues to solving the case. 
  • Author and primatologist Frans de Waal says most animals have emotions as complex as humans. He talks about primate societies and what they might reveal about ourselves in his book Mama's Last Hug.

Full Episode Transcript