The Current for January 22, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at the rush to draw damning conclusions from video of the Indigenous protester and the teenagers in MAGA hats; plus, Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction Bill Blair discusses efforts to reduce gun violence in Canada; we look at how to avoid tragedies like the death of Hélène Rowley Hotte, a 93-year-old who froze to death after getting locked out of her home; and what does swearing at AI assistants say about us as human beings?
Anna Maria Tremonti hosts The Current's 17th season. (CBC)
Listen to the full episode1:14:28

Today on The Current

  • An interaction between a Catholic schoolboy and an Indigenous protester in Washington D.C. enflamed passions online over the weekend, with some saying the scene summed up all that's wrong with America — its racism, bullying and hyper-partisan politics. But new footage paints a more complicated picture. We look at the rush to judgment online, and how we sometimes cling to damning conclusions, without all the facts.
  • After One Bullet, The Current's series on gun violence last week, Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction Bill Blair discusses efforts to reduce gun violence in Canada.
  • Hélène Rowley Hotte, 93, died of hypothermia Sunday after getting locked out of the Lux Gouverneur seniors' complex when an alarm went off. We talk to Globe and Mail health columnist André Picard about how tragedies like this can be avoided.
  • Do you swear or lash out at Siri or Google when the AI assistant doesn't follow your commands? We talk to experts about what our interactions with the devices could say about human beings.

Full Episode Transcript