The Current

The Current for February 22, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at whether what Michael Wernick told the justice committee sheds any more light on the SNC-Lavalin affair; plus, we explore an unusual way to stay young and healthy — injecting yourself with the blood of millennials; we also drill into what the National Energy Board wants in order for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to be built; and we discuss the effect that space travel can have on an astronaut’s mental health.
Laura Lynch guest hosts The Current. (CBC)
Listen to the full episode1:22:28

Full Episode Transcript

Today on The Current:

  • Ottawa was gripped when Michael Wernick, clerk of the privy council, spoke before the justice committee Thursday. But has it shed any more light on the SNC-Lavalin affair? We ask three experts to dissect what he had to say.
  • Here's an unusual way to stay feeling young and healthy: inject the blood of a younger person directly into your veins. A company in the U.S. was charging people thousands of dollars for a litre of blood from someone aged 16-25, but authorities have warned that "there is no proven clinical benefit." We look at the latest idea in bio-hacking.
  • The National Energy Board has released a list of conditions that will have to be met for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to go ahead. We break down what's at stake, and what lies ahead for the troubled project.
  • The technology to send astronauts to Mars may be here before we know it, but the trip to get there could put astronauts under serious psychological strain. We look at some of the work being done to understand and improve that often-overlooked aspect of travelling to the stars: astronauts' mental health.