The Current

The Current for February 14, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at the situation in Venezuela, from struggling hospitals to the soldiers considering their loyalties; plus, we examine the politics at play behind Jody Wilson-Raybould’s resignation and the SNC-Lavalin affair; a new CBC documentary warns that air pollution may be far worse than you think; and we look at the career of famed American architect Philip Johnson, who helped the Nazis push their fascist agenda during the Second World War.
Anna Maria Tremonti hosts The Current's 17th season. (CBC)
Listen to the full episode1:14:28

Full Episode Transcript

Today on The Current:

  • The unfolding political crisis in Venezuela shows no sign of resolution as two president's spar, people struggle with food shortages, and soldiers consider their loyalties. The National's Adrienne Arsenault has been in the country for weeks; she tells us what she's seen.
  • What exactly are the politics at play behind former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould's resignation, and the SNC-Lavalin affair? Maclean's writer Paul Wells helps us connect the dots.
  • A new CBC documentary warns that air pollution may be far worse than you think. We look at the data, and hear from one expert who says there could be a link between ultrafine particles in our air, and Alzheimer's.
  • We look at the career of famed American architect Philip Johnson, whose buildings dot cities all across the continent, including the Canadian Broadcasting Centre in Toronto. Author and architecture critic Mark Lamster tells us there was another side to Johnson — a fascist who helped the Nazis push their agenda during the Second World War.