The Current

The effects of climate change force vulnerable communities to adapt

On Monday's program we looked at the dangerous consequences if the planet were to warm more than two degrees. We heard from people around the world whose communities are vulnerable to climate change. We continue this discussion, and hear from people in other places already seeing the effects.
Socheath Sou is the director of Live & Learn Environmental Education. Here he is in May of 2013, inspecting the effects of drought on cassava.

On Monday's program, we looked at the dangerous consequences if the planet were to warm more than two degrees. In our special we heard from people around the world whose communities are vulnerable to climate change.

Here are a few more people we spoke to in other places that are already seeing the effects. Listen above to their stories. 

Socheath Sou is from Cambodia. This picture was taken at a COP21 Together for Climate conference in Phnom Penh.

In Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Socheath Sou is the executive director of Live and Learn Environmental Education. He says they're still waiting for the rains that normally start in August. And adds that where he lives, the heat is getting even hotter.

Fuqiang Yang is a Senior Adviser on Climate, Energy and Environment for the NRDC China Program, in Beijing.

In Beijing, Fuqiang Yang is the climate change advisor for the environmental organization NRDC. The country is the world's biggest greenhouse gas emitter, and is feeling the effects at home.

Harold Wanless is chair of the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Miam. This photo was taken at high tide in a residential area of Miami Beach on Sept 28, 2015.

Meanwhile, closer to home, Harold Wanless is the chair of the geological sciences department at the University of Miami. He's raising alarms about the beachside real estate that keeps rising - as the waters rise.

This segment was produced by The Current's Karin Marley.

now