The Current

'We need to see miscarriage as an emotional emergency', says nurse

A preliminary finding of Ontario's Human Rights Tribunal has defined a miscarriage as a disability. Health advocates hope the ruling will change how miscarriage is treated, taking into account the emotional distress. The Current looks at implications for the workplace and health care.
Twenty-five per cent of all pregnancies end in miscarriage. A preliminary finding of Ontario's Human Rights Tribunal has defined a miscarriage as a disability. (Lee Haywood/Flickr cc)
Listen19:03

Read story transcript

When Winnie Mou, of Markham, Ont., suffered a miscarriage in 2013, it wasn't just a physically harrowing experience. She fell into a severe and disabling depression. So bad, in fact, she was fired from her job.

But after taking her case to the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal, it seems Winnie Mou's lost pregnancy, and all the emotional distress that followed, could create a significant precedent in Canada's most populous province.

In March 2016, the Tribunal recognized her miscarriage as a disability.

It's final ruling on the case isn't in yet, but this interim decision has many women's health advocates hopeful that a long-taboo subject could be getting the recognition and status it deserves. 

Today The Current looks at the implications for the workplace and for health care and highlight the emotional distress that is often not treated. 

Guests in this segment:

We requested an interview with Ms. Mou's lawyer but she declined.

Should miscarriage be considered a disability?

Find us on Twitter @TheCurrentCBC. Send us an email. Or find us on Facebook.

This segment was produced by The Current's Liz Hoath and Willow Smith.