The Current

Corporate America embraces gay rights in light of anti-LGBT legislation

The anti-LGBT laws passed in the southern U.S. has created a backlash on the part of corporate America. The bill blocks local governments from enacting laws with anti-discrimination protections for LGBT people. The Current looks at the optics for corporate America.
Protesters call for Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant to veto House Bill 1523, which they says will allow discrimination against LGBT people, April 4, 2016. (Rogelio V. Solis/AP)
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The push for LGBTQ rights in the U.S. is facing pushback with a series of new anti-LGBTQ laws in some southern U.S. states. 

This has been a difficult week for gay and transgender North Carolinians.  We came under attack from the North Carolina Assembly and governor McCrory, when they hastily and without real consideration of consequences passed a dangerous house bill.- Chris Sgro from Equality NC on new legislation in North Carolina. 

The bill blocks local governments from enacting laws with anti-discrimination protections for LGBTQ people. It also requires transgender people to use bathrooms that correspond to their biological sex.  

These laws have created a backlash on the part of corporate America. About a dozen companies are pushing back against discriminatory laws in states including North Carolina, Mississippi, and Georgia. 

On April 5, 2016, PayPal president and C.E.O. Dan Schulman cancelled plans to open a new operations center in North Carolina that would have employed more than 400 people.  

And movie studio Lionsgate has just moved the filming of one of its new TV shows our of North Caronlina and into B.C.

Deena Fidas, the director of the workplace equality program at Human Rights Campaign, says corporate America supporting gay rights is the right move and makes sense for bottom lines. She joins The Current's Anna Maria Tremonti in studio to talk about the optics.
 

This segment was produced by The Current's Lara O'Brien.