The Current

Why 43 students disappeared in Mexico may never be known

A scathing report released by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights investigating the disappearance of 43 Mexican students has sparked questions into how officials handled the case. The Current speaks with a member of the panel that issued the report.
People hold signs during a march to mark the first anniversary of the disappearance of the students from Mexico's Ayotzinapa College Raul Isidro Burgos, in Mexico City, Sept. 2015. The signs read "No more missing, no more dead. Pena Nieto out". (Edgard Garrido/Reuters)
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On April 26, thousands took to the streets, angered by the government's handling of an investigation into 43 missing students.  

It comes days after a scathing report was released by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. It was investigating the disappearance of the trainee teachers, who were last seen in Sept. 2014.

Images of the disappeared 43 rural college students are illuminated during a candlelight vigil, in Mexico City, March 26, 2015. (Marco Ugarte/Associated Press)

Francisco Cox is a member of the panel that issued the report.  He is a Chilean human rights and criminal lawyer who believes the International report into the 43 missing Mexican students was not as revelatory as it could have been. Cox alleges Mexican officials stymied the independent investigation. 

This segment was produced by The Current's Ines Colabrese.