The Current

Forensic research helps identify names of missing aboriginal women

New research has come out out of Nova Scotia that could help unlock the stories of the unsolved cases of missing and murdered aboriginal women across Canada. The new tool that is used to identify remains has been in the works for a decade.
CBC tells the stories of 230 women who have gone missing or have been found murdered, including interviews with 110 families. (CBC)

Earlier this month, CBC News launched a major new project, investigating the unsolved cases of missing and murdered aboriginal women from across the country... from the past six decades. 

Some new research coming out of Nova Scotia, could be helping to unlock more of those stories soon by helping to put names, and faces, to human remains. It does it by focusing on measurements of skin thickness.

Dr. Tanya Peckmann is Coordinator of the Forensic Sciences Program at Saint Mary's University. She's an associate professor in the department of anthropology. Tanya Peckmann was in Halifax.


This segment was produced by The Current's Howard Goldenthal. 

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