The Current

Future looks bright for electric cars but Canada's infrastructure lacking

Consumers are getting all charged up over a new generation of electric cars. But Canada's infrastructure may be lagging behind drivers' enthusiasm. The Current takes the on-ramp towards the future for electric cars, stopping at speed bumps along the way.
Pre-orders for the Tesla Model 3 are at 325,000 and growing, which adds up to $14 billion worth of electric cars.

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The pre-orders for the Tesla Model 3 since April 1 — when the company unveiled its latest model — stand at 325,000 and growing, adding up to $14 billion worth of electric cars. 

The Model 3 is not only the biggest production launch in history but it says something important about consumer appetite for electric cars.

Until now, e-vehicles have been confined to a fairly niche lane. They make up just one per cent of Canadian cars right now. But many — including Tesla itself — believe the Model 3 will be a game-changer — thanks in large part to its more affordable price tag. 

And the federal government seems poised to help in the mainstreaming of electric vehicles. It dedicated more than $62 million in the federal budget to improving alternate forms of travel, which includes increasing the number of electric car charging stations. 

Is Canada ready for an influx of electric cars?

Guests in this segment:

  • Peter Cheney, national driving columnist with The Globe and Mail. 
  • Alex Louis, VP of sales at Add Energie that installs charging stations across Canada, including apartment and condo complexes. 
  • Jest Sidloski, director of Peavey Mart, a retailer that installs electric vehicle chargers at its locations. 

Find out more about Canada's electric car industry, April 12, on the World at 6 and on CBC's The National with reporter Margo McDiarmid.

Have you made the move to electric, or are you considering it? Let us know.

We're on Facebook, and on Twitter @TheCurrentCBC. Or send us an email.

This segment was produced by Calgary's network producer Michael O'Halloran.

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