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Inmates are fighting California wildfires for less than a dollar an hour

'We’re doing the dirty work, the hardest work, the work nobody wants to do.' Amika Mota worked as a firefighter when she was incarcerated in California. At the top paying gig, she made 53 cents an hour.

We should regulate Facebook just like we did cars, says professor

Facebook has been on the defensive recently, after allegations about how it handled crises like privacy breaches. And one professor of media studies says Facebook is disrupting democracy.
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Are long hours & little pay scaring off potential public servants?

Alcide Bernard was appointed mayor of Wellington, P.E.I last week — because nobody else wanted the job. Is there a crisis in local politics, where the long hours and little pay are scaring off potential public servants?

Nov. 16, 2018 episode transcript

Full text transcript for the November 16th episode

'It made me who I was': How growing up adopted fuelled Curtis Joseph's NHL career

It wasn't until Curtis Joseph was a grown man playing in the NHL that he met his biological mother. When he did, he knew exactly what he wanted to say: he thanked her for having him.

We should regulate Facebook just like we did cars, says professor

Facebook has been on the defensive this week, after allegations about how it handled crises like privacy breaches. And one professor of media studies says Facebook is disrupting democracy.

We should regulate Facebook just like we did cars, says professor

Facebook has been on the defensive this week, after allegations about how it handled crises like privacy breaches. And one professor of media studies says Facebook is disrupting democracy.

Missing former Guantanamo inmates are 'worst nightmare' for U.S. officials: reporter

U.S. President Donald Trump made good on a campaign promise to halt the closure of Guantanamo Bay. He did so by closing the office responsible for shutting it down. But that office also tracked released inmates, and now some of them are missing. We look at the risks both to the public, and the former detainees.

Missing former Guantanamo inmates are 'worst nightmare' for U.S. officials: reporter

U.S. President Donald Trump made good on a campaign promise to halt the closure of Guantanamo Bay. He did so by closing the office responsible for shutting it down. But that office also tracked released inmates, and now some of them are missing. We look at the risks both to the public, and the former detainees.

Missing former Guantanamo inmates are 'worst nightmare' for U.S. officials: reporter

U.S. President Donald Trump made good on a campaign promise to halt the closure of Guantanamo Bay. He did so by closing the office responsible for shutting it down. But that office also tracked released inmates, and now some of them are missing. We look at the risks both to the public, and the former detainees.

'It made me who I was': How growing up adopted fuelled Curtis Joseph's NHL career

It wasn't until Curtis Joseph was a grown man playing in the NHL that he met his biological mother. When he did, he knew exactly what he wanted to say: he thanked her for having him.

'It made me who I was': How growing up adopted fuelled Curtis Joseph's NHL career

It wasn't until Curtis Joseph was a grown man playing in the NHL that he met his biological mother. When he did, he knew exactly what he wanted to say: he thanked her for having him.

The Current for November 16, 2018

Today on The Current we look at accusations that Facebook has been 'screwing up, covering up and lawyering up' over recent scandals; hockey great Curtis Joseph opens up about overcoming a difficult childhood to realize his sporting dreams; and we explore how a White House decision about Guantanamo Bay has inadvertently led to former inmates going missing.

Trade talks would have run smoother if the U.S. had been more organized, says former ambassador

Former U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman says the renegotiation of NAFTA could have gone a lot smoother but there is plenty of hope for the future of Canada-U.S. relations.
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There needs to be a global policy to govern gene editing, says molecular biologist

Gene drive technology, which can introduce and spread a specific genetic trait through an entire species, is near the point where it leaves the lab and enters the real world. Some experts are calling for a global agreement on how the technology should be deployed, which could make for a showdown between scientists and policy makers at a UN meeting on biodiversity later this week.

Thursday November 15, 2018 Full Transcript

Full text transcript for November 15th episode.

There needs to be a global policy to govern gene editing, says molecular biologist

Gene drive technology, which can introduce and spread a specific genetic trait through an entire species, is near the point where it leaves the lab and enters the real world. Some experts are calling for a global agreement on how the technology should be deployed, which could make for a showdown between scientists and policy makers at a UN meeting on biodiversity later this week.

Trade talks would have run smoother if the U.S. had been more organised, says former ambassador

Former U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman says the renegotiation of NAFTA could have gone a lot smoother, but there is plenty of hope for the future of Canada-U.S. relations.

Trade talks would have run smoother if the U.S. had been more organised, says former ambassador

Former U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman says the renegotiation of NAFTA could have gone a lot smoother but there is plenty of hope for the future of Canada-U.S. relations.

As death toll rises in California fires, forensic anthropologists face grim task of identifying remains

As wildfires ravage California and the death toll continues to rise, we talk to a forensic anthropologist about the challenges in identifying victims and the importance of bringing some sense of closure to their loved ones.

As death toll rises in California fires, forensic anthropologists face grim task of identifying remains

As wildfires ravage California and the death toll continues to rise, we talk to a forensic anthropologist about the challenges in identifying victims and the importance of bringing some sense of closure to their loved ones.

How a Canadian 'giraffologist' stuck her neck out to fight sexism

Canadian biologist Anne Dagg was denied tenure decades ago, despite her pioneering research on giraffes. Now, she's finally getting recognition — and she wants to make sure young women scientists today don't have to fight the way she did.

The Current for November 15, 2018

Today on The Current we speak to a forensic anthropologist about the challenges they face in identifying victims in disasters like the California wildfires; we ask former U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman what's in store for Canada-U.S. relations; and we discuss the ethical issues regarding gene drives, which can introduce and spread a specific genetic trait through an entire species.

Wednesday November 24, 2018 Full Transcript

Full text transcript for November 14th episode.

How a Canadian 'giraffologist' stuck her neck out to fight sexism in academia

Canadian biologist Anne Dagg was denied tenure decades ago, despite her pioneering research on giraffes. She's finally getting recognition in her field — and she wants to make sure young women scientists today don't have to fight the way she did.