The Current

Paul Calandra's emotional daytime television apology

Last week, the leader of the opposition joined us to complain about Question Period. Specifically Tom Mulcair was angry that serious questions he had about Canada's role in Iraq weren't answered. In fact, they were completely ignored, by the prime minister's parliamentary secretary, Many of our listeners were as angry as Mr. Mulcair and on Friday Mr. Calandra responded with...
Last week, the leader of the opposition joined us to complain about Question Period. Specifically Tom Mulcair was angry that serious questions he had about Canada's role in Iraq weren't answered. In fact, they were completely ignored, by the prime minister's parliamentary secretary, Many of our listeners were as angry as Mr. Mulcair and on Friday Mr. Calandra responded with a tearful apology.

Wyatt Rivers of Ottawa told us:

Something needs to be changed if our Government and Elected Officials can not even pretend to follow rules, answer the questions posed or defend the Government's decisions. How can we offer democratic advice and guidance to other countries when we can't even follow a democratic process.


And we heard this, from John Kidder of Ashcroft, BC:

Fifteen years ago I decided to expose my son to the workings of Parliament... After lunch in the Parliamentary Dining Room we went to Question Period. Kendall bore it for about twenty minutes, then turned to me and said "Dad, this is just really bad theatre sports - let's get out of here." So much for the majesty of parliamentary democracy.


As you may have heard, a chastened Paul Calandra returned to the Commons Friday with an apology, and became quite emotional. Something not usually seen on the parliamentary channel mid-afternoon ... but rather reserved for other kinds of daytime drama.

Paul Calandra gets today's Last Word.

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