The Current

Students assaulting teachers in class, a common occurrence in Canada

A CBC investigation turned up a surprisingly high incidence of reported assaults by students against teachers. Teachers say many assaults go under reported, every school year. We hear from a teacher who's still scarred by a student assault from years ago. And ask what can be done to make our classrooms a safer place... both for our students, and school...
A CBC investigation turned up a surprisingly high incidence of reported assaults by students against teachers. Teachers say many assaults go under reported, every school year. We hear from a teacher who's still scarred by a student assault from years ago. And ask what can be done to make our classrooms a safer place... both for our students, and school staff.



Standing up in front of a class full of students to teach is often described as a challenging, occasionally frustrating, but ultimately fulfilling job. It's rarely thought of as a dangerous one. But a new investigation by CBC News is teaching a different lesson about the dangers that teachers face... from their own students.

CBC Winnipeg's I-Team looked into reported violence in Manitoba's capital and found that between September 2012, and January 2014, there were 134 physical attacks on school staff reported in one school division.

And Winnipeg isn't alone.

According to the British Columbia Teachers' Federation and WorkSafe BC, 115 worker's in that province's education sector take time off work every year due to injuries inflicted on them by students. It's a problem that doesn't get a lot of attention, but can have very serious consequences for teachers who do experience assault in the classroom.

It happened to Janice Wilson in 2006. She's a teacher in the northern Saskatchewan village of La Loche.


Janice Wilson's story is a particularly tragic example of classroom assault on a teacher. But as we're hearing today, violence against teachers is a more common problem inside our schools than many understand.

We brought together a panel now to talk about the issue, and what can be done to keep both educators and students safe.


Have thoughts you want to add to this discussion?

Tweet us @thecurrentcbc. Or e-mail us through our website. Find us on Facebook. Call us toll-free at 1 877 287 7366. And as always if you missed anything on The Current, grab a podcast.

This segment was produced by The Current's Sarah Grant, Shannon Higgins and Pacinthe Mattar.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversationCreate account

Already have an account?

now