The Current

A new battle plan for the war on drugs in Mexico

Today drug cartels supplying American demand are stronger than ever, and far more violent. We hear from a new movement hoping to persuade Mexico's government to re-think its countermeasures and Just Say No to the way the war on drugs is being waged now....
Today drug cartels supplying American demand are stronger than ever, and far more violent. We hear from a new movement hoping to persuade Mexico's government to re-think its countermeasures and Just Say No to the way the war on drugs is being waged now.



A call for a new battle plan in the war on drugs from some people who've suffered the most.

America's public enemy number one in the United States is drug abuse. In order to fight and defeat this enemy, it is necessary to wage a new all-out offensive.Richard Nixon, US President (1969-1974)

mexico-war-drugs-insert-200.jpg

Teresa Carmona holds a photo of her
late son Joaquin Garcia, 21, killed in
Mexico City. (AP/Eduardo Verdugo)

Richard Nixon's first declared "War on Drugs" in the United States. But it's safe to say most of the fatalities in this war have been in Mexico. Since 2006, it's estimated the drug wars have killed 70,000 people, another 26,000 are missing.

This week in the town of Matamoros on the US-Mexico border, 13 people were killed by members of drug cartels. The gun battles in the streets have gotten so bad that the mayor urges residents to stay inside.

Teresa Carmona's son Joaquin was murdered in his home in Mexico City in 2010. Poet Javier Sicilia's son Juan Francisco was also murdered in 2011. They're part of the movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity, a group calling for a complete overhaul of the current approach to the war on drugs.

Anna Maria Tremonti spoke with Teresa Carmona and through a translator Javier Sicilia earlier this week.


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This segment was produced by The Current's Lara O'Brien and Natalie Chu.


Music Bridge: Calm Down - APM Music.com


Last Word - Rob Ford's Apology

People who live outside Toronto often complain the city thinks of itself as the centre of the universe. Well, thanks to the mayor, the city has certainly been the centre of the world's attention.

Yesterday's events at city hall were chronicled in international broadsheets and tabloids, on the 24-hour news networks and comedy shows. Perhaps someday it might make an interesting ballet or musical. Until then, here's a little of how it all unravelled, set to the music of ol' Slowhand.



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