The Current

Why Qatar is being called a slave state as it prepares for the 2022 FIFA World Cup

Qatar prepares to welcome the world in 2022 when it hosts the World Cup. But Amnesty International believes it's not offering much of a welcome to the migrant workers employed to construct the new buildings and stadiums for the games....
Qatar prepares to welcome the world in 2022 when it hosts the World Cup. But Amnesty International believes it's not offering much of a welcome to the migrant workers employed to construct the new buildings and stadiums for the games.



When Qatar learned it would host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, the country turned into a giant construction site, luring workers from around the world. But it's hardly a worker's paradise.

 

That announcement almost two years ago set off a building boom in Qatar as the country rushed to host the FIFA World Cup. New stadiums, hotels, even hospitals have transformed the Qatari skyline.

And it couldn't have happened without help of migrant workers.... apparently poorly paid and abused migrant workers. A new study released this month by Amnesty International chronicles the inhumane conditions many workers endure.

Qatar: End corporate exploitation of migrant construction workers -- Amnesty International

Thomas Matthew worked in Qatar from 2007 until earlier this year as a safety manager for the construction company, the Indian Trading and Contracting Group. It operated as a subcontractor in Qatar. For the last 6 and half months he worked there, he was not paid. Thomas Matthew was at his home in Chennai, India.

James Lynch is the author of the Amnesty International report titled: The Dark Side of Migration: Spotlight on Qatar's Construction sector ahead of the World Cup. He was in London, England.

The International Trade Union Confederation hopes the spotlight on Qatar can be an opportunity for change. It has been lobbying to change the labour laws in Qatar to better protect workers, and is sending a delegation to Qatar to meet with officials and workers later this week.

Tim Noonan is the Director of Campaigns and Communications with the International Trade Union Confederation, or ITUC. He was in Brussels.

Qatar says it signed many agreements that protect workers rights, but recognizes the booming economy has caused problems that need to be solved.

Ali Alkhlaifi is the International Relations Advisor with the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs in Qatar. He was in Doha, Qatar.


Revealed: Investigating Qatar's World Cup 'slaves'


Exclusive: Abuse and exploitation of migrant workers
preparing emirate for 2022 - The Guardian








Report: Building a Better World Cup - Human Rights Watch








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This segment was produced by The Current's Sujata Berry.

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