The Current

Is passing Bill C-13 the best way to curb cyberbullying in Canada?

If passed, the Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act would change the way we deal with internet crime. Some say the proposal groups together crimes that have little to do with each other. Others say we need to act fast to protect our kids from cyberbullying....
If passed, the Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act would change the way we deal with internet crime. Some say the proposal groups together crimes that have little to do with each other. Others say we need to act fast to protect our kids from cyberbullying.
"We will find out who you are. We will make you accountable. We do not forget. We do not forgive. Expect us." Anonymous

The tragic stories of cyberbullied teen victims Amanda Todd and Rehtaeh Parsons resonated with people around the world.

Anonymous, the international network of computer hackers, even promised to track down the bullies, especially when it looked like governments and police couldn't.

The parents of the teenagers are now advocates for better legislation against online cruelty. This week, Amanda's mother, Carol Todd, and Rehtaeh Parson's father, Glenn Canning, shared their thoughts on The Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act with a House of Commons committee.

Some call the proposal an attack on privacy, and an omnibus bill that bunches together crimes that have little to do with each other. Others say urgent measures are needed to protect children from online predators.

  • Carol Todd is the mother of Amanda Todd, who took her life in 2012 after being bullied online. She was in Vancouver.
  • Glen Canning is the father of Rehtaeh Parsons, who died in 2013 following online harassment. He was in Halifax.

What do you think about Bill C-13?

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This segment was produced by The Current's Sarah Grant and Cynthia Vukets.

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