The Current

The Hogan Sisters: How conjoined twins share body and mind

You may remember when Felicia Hogan gave birth to twins Tatiana and Krista in B.C. They made headlines around the world, conjoined twins whose brains were connected and impossible to separate.That was seven years ago and since that time these two little girls are growing up surrounded by a loving family and accepting classmates. And they are taking their doctors...
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You may remember when Felicia Hogan gave birth to twins Tatiana and Krista in B.C. They made headlines around the world, conjoined twins whose brains were connected and impossible to separate.That was seven years ago and since that time these two little girls are growing up surrounded by a loving family and accepting classmates. And they are taking their doctors into a new world where their unique condition allows each to see feel and taste what the other does with an elasticity of the brain that may have implications for others.






When they were born there was no guarantee they'd survive twenty-four hours. But while they've had some medical scares, the Hogan twins have since enjoyed a relatively typical childhood. 
With an astonishing difference, in many ways, the girls share a mind; they literally see the world through each others' eyes. They can also feel and even taste what the other twin experiences -- something that becomes an issue at the dinner table.


Listen to this short clip to find out what happens when only one twin likes ketchup.


Tatiana and Krista star in a new documentary debuting on CBC TV's doc zone tonight at 7 p.m.

The director and producer of "Twin Life," Judith Pyke, was in our Vancouver studio today.

Tatiana and Krista's mom, Felicia Hogan joined us from our studio in Kelowna, BC.


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twins and family.jpg OTHER STORIES FROM THE CURRENT'S ARCHIVES




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This segment was produced by The Current's Peter Mitton

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