The Current

Labels are for Cans: Autism in the workplace

Jordan Edwards has autism. High-functioning, but underemployed, he now weighs the pros and cons of whether to disclose his so-called "invisible disability" to a future employer....
Jordan Edwards has autism. High-functioning, but underemployed, he now weighs the pros and cons of whether to disclose his so-called "invisible disability" to a future employer.

People with high-functioning autism are said to have an "invisible disability." But it's not always completely invisible. There can be problems communicating, troublesome ticks, or socially inappropriate behaviour. Sometimes, it's enough to result in dismissal.

When I got my diagnosis...at the beginning I was overwhelmed and I didn't know how to tell people.Jordan Edwards

Advocates say workplaces should be more accommodating. But as CBC Reporter Julie Ireton discovered, there is a bigger debate taking place about whether autistic workers should stay quiet and hope no one notices, or reveal all and hope an employer will be sympathetic.

Have you had an experience with autism in the workplace?

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This segment was produced by The Current's Joan Webber.

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