The Current

A Life Undercover with Killers Kingpins, Bikers and Druglords

For decades Bob Deasy was a guy who even the toughest criminals believed they could trust. He hung out with drug kingpins, made friends in the Russian mafia. He was an undercover cop perfecting the role of Mr. Big. Today we hear from Bob Deasy on a career fighting organized crime from the inside....
OPP, RCMP and Kingston City Police in the Outlaws clubhouse after the takedown.

For decades Bob Deasy was a guy who even the toughest criminals believed they could trust. He hung out with drug kingpins, made friends in the Russian mafia. He was an undercover cop perfecting the role of Mr. Big. Today we hear from Bob Deasy on a career fighting organized crime from the inside. 

Almost all of them said, well, there is one other thing. And I said what's that? Well, I sort of killed somebody. - Bob Deasy, Undercover Cop for OPP

There's a reason movies and television shows are fascinated with undercover cops... In fact there are lots of reasons: the inherent danger, the stress filled life, the action and the fact that hardly anyone really wants to do it.

But Bob Deasy led the uneasy life for years with the Ontario Provincial Police and infiltrated some of Canada's most notorious crime groups.

Bob Deasy has just written a book about those years called Being Uncle Charlie: A Life Undercover with Killers Kingpins, Bikers and Druglords. He was in Toronto.

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This segment was produced by The Current's Liz Hoath.

Bob Deasy in the cockpit of "Air Cannabis" - an Air Canada 747 stopped at Pearson with a massive load of marijuana and cocaine from Jamaica. Toronto, 1995. (Random House of Canada)

Last Word: Ariel Sharon's UN Speech, 2005

Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon will be buried at his ranch in the Negev desert today, but the conversation about his legacy will no doubt carry on.

Speaking in Hebrew, Sharon addressed the United Nations General Assembly on September 15, 2005 -- just four months before he suffered the massive stroke that precipitated the almost eight years he spent in a coma.

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stands in front of the grave of former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon near Sycamore Farm, Sharon's residence in southern Israel, January 13, 2014. (Baz Ratner/Reuters)

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