The Current

From Harry Potter to Winnie the Pooh, beloved children's books shape lives

Reading a good book can transport us to another place. And when a story captures the imagination of a child, it can stay with them forever. We explore the lasting influence of two books... one about a legendary boy wizard and the other, a silly old bear.
Reading a good book can transport us to another place. And when a story captures the imagination of a child, it can stay with them forever. We explore the lasting influence of two books... one about a legendary boy wizard and the other, a silly old bear.

Reading a good book can transport us to another place. And when a story captures the imagination of a child, it can stay with them forever.

In 1914, Harry Colebourn rescued a baby bear and took the bear to war. He named her Winnie, after his hometown of Winnpeg.
Ripple Effect
explores the lasting influence of two books — one about a legendary boy wizard and the other about a silly old bear.

To the Canadian writer Lindsay Mattick, Winnie the Pooh is like family... in a way.  Her great-grandfather, Harry Colbourn, was the First World War soldier who first came to love a little bear cub he called Winnie, after his hometown of Winnipeg. 

The silly old bear is easily one of the most adored children's characters of the last century and the current one as well.

In her book, Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World's Most Famous Bear, Mattick shares the tale of Winnie the Pooh, an unlikely First World War legacy.

From the hundred acre wood... to the forbidden forest...

Meet the Harry Potter generation

7 years ago
Duration 1:24
Meet the Harry Potter generation


J.K. Rowling's best-selling book Harry Potter series will go down in history as a cultural and corporate juggernaut. 

But for some, the boy wizard came to represent more than just magic and merchandise.

In the documentary, All Was Well, CBC producer Shannon Higgins explores how Harry Potter's wizarding-world became an intensely formative experience that helped shape a generation.


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