The Current

Sudanese political cartoonist shares his art on social media to mobilize the Arab Spring revolution

In September, journalist Hisham Melhem joined us to talk about his fears over the collapse of Arab civilization, post-Arab Spring. Khalid Albaih says the movement is in its infancy and its success or failure is a long way off. Khalid Albaih is a Sudanese political cartoonist dedicated to documenting the Arab Spring revolutions on his website Khartoon!...
In September, journalist Hisham Melhem joined us to talk about his fears over the collapse of Arab civilization, post-Arab Spring. Khalid Albaih says the movement is in its infancy and its success or failure is a long way off. Khalid Albaih is a Sudanese political cartoonist dedicated to documenting the Arab Spring revolutions on his website Khartoon!

His work resonates with demonstrators and his cartoons have been used as weapons of political protest on t-shirts, banners and even replicated as graffiti. Mr. Albaih lives and works in Doha. We spoke to him last week when he was talking about his his work at McGill University in Montreal.


Here are some examples of Khalid Albaih's work


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"The Rest Will Follow" features a fist with different Arab flags painted on each finger. The Tunisian flag was affixed to the raised middle finger, a message Mr. Albaih meant for Arab dictators.


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Mubarak "insistent" cartoon featuring a silhouette of Mr. Mubarak's face with the word "Egypt" in Arabic next to it. It was marked with an accent, though, that altered the word's meaning to "insistent."


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"Sudan Needs a Hug," which reflects the overwhelming feeling of sadness and failure that many northern Sudanese felt when Sudan split into two.


This segment was produced by The Current's Sujata Berry.


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