The Current

Is it time for a dress code for parents? Some educators in Florida think so.

There's something decidedly odd about the state of 21st century style when cassocks and pellegrinas trump male fashion. Then again ... the Pope has a dress code, something they'd like to institute in a particular Florida school district for parents dropping their kids off at school....
There's something decidedly odd about the state of 21st century style when cassocks and pellegrinas trump male fashion. Then again ... the Pope has a dress code, something they'd like to institute in a particular Florida school district for parents dropping their kids off at school.

"So I would go out there in just pyjama pants and a sweatshirt. Put my son on the bus. Thought it was no big deal. And my wife however, she just kinda said, "Hey", you know... don't you feel a little weird going out of the house in pyjama pants. And I said "No, not at all!" An involved parent in pyjamas is a lot better than an absentee parent in Armani." Aaron Gouveia

Aaron Gouveia may not like to admit it, but it's possible to be an involved parent and dress in Armani. If the first shots have been fired in a culture war over fashion, it won't be hard to spot the uniforms of the casual side.

Dr. Rosalind Osgood of Broward County School Board in Florida says parents who drop off children in sweat pants, short shorts and curlers set a bad example. She says the school needs a dress code ... for parents. Although that's unlikely, Dr. Osgood's suggestion has struck a nerve.




Dressing well is no joke for our panel.


  • Kim Flanagan is a Calgary-based stylist whose goal is to push women to "dress like they give a damn." She was in our Calgary studio.


  • David Eddie is a columnist with The Globe and Mail and author of Damage Control. David was in our Toronto studio.

So how did the dress code devolve?

Linda Przybyszewski is an Assoc Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame  in Indiana, and the author of the upcoming book The Lost Art of Dress: The Women who once made America Stylish.


dress-code-pedro-560.jpg

A dapper Pedro Mendes from the Toronto School for Gentlemen at Kingpin's Hideway, Toronto. (Lawrence Cortez)


Have thoughts you want to share on a dress code for parents? Or about the nostalgic days of when dressing up was more common?

Tweet us @thecurrentcbc. Or e-mail us through our website. Find us on Facebook. Call us toll-free at 1 877 287 7366. And as always if you missed anything on The Current, grab a podcast.

This segment was produced by The Current's Pacinthe Mattar, Sarah Grant and Jessica DeMello.


Last Word: The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T

There's no doubt people used to take dressing a lot more seriously ... just look at the clothes in the films from a few decades ago. In fact, if you really want to gape open-mouthed, take a look at the 1953 film, The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T.

It's about a mad musician who forces 500 boys to play his composition at a giant piano-- but not before he gets dressed up for the occasion. It's the only feature film written by the man who would eventually become known as Dr. Seuss. Who knew the doctor was such a fashion plate? He gets today's Last Word.



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