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Sidewalk Labs' $1.3B plan for Toronto's waterfront is bad for democracy, critic says

Sidewalk Labs' master development plan for the Toronto waterfront is out. Critics say it's a recipe for a dystopian, surveilled future, but supporters say there's promise in the proposal and the future of smart cities. We hear arguments from both sides of the debate.

Sidewalk Labs' $1.3B plan for Toronto's waterfront is bad for democracy, critic says

Sidewalk Labs' master development plan for the Toronto waterfront is out, but critics have long fretted that an Alphabet Inc.-backed entity is a recipe for a dystopian, surveilled future. Supporters say there's promise in the proposal and the future of smart cities. We hear arguments from both sides of the debate.

June 25, 2019 episode transcript

Full text transcript for the June 25th episode

The Current for June 25, 2019

Today on The Current: We hear from critics and supporters of Sidewalk Labs' master development plan for the Toronto waterfront; we explore what it would take to reduce the use of single-use plastics in daily life; and we continue with Episode 2 of the CBC podcast Uncover: The Village.

'Little by little': How this woman is saying goodbye to single-use plastics

Concerns over mounds of Canadian plastic waste in Malaysia and the Philippines have amplified the issue of non-recyclable plastic. We explore what it would take to reduce the use of single-use plastics in daily life.

Migrant kids in U.S. detention are separated from adults for their own safety, says former immigration judge

Lawyers representing migrant children at the southern U.S. border say the minors were being held without access to necessities like soap or toothpaste, and that many fell ill in facilities where kids are left to care for kids. One of the lawyers tells The Current that conditions are terrible, while a former judge says the concerns are overblown.

June 24, 2019 episode transcript

Full text transcript for the June 24th episode

What was that podcast I heard on The Current?

All summer long, The Current is bringing you the best from CBC podcasts. Here's what we're playing on air, and where to find more episodes online.

Migrant kids in U.S. detention are separated from adults for their own safety, says former immigration judge

Lawyers representing migrant children at the southern U.S. border say the minors are being held without access to necessities like soap or toothpaste, and that many are falling ill in facilities where kids are left to care for kids. One of the lawyers tells The Current that conditions are terrible, while a former judge says the concerns are overblown.

How social media has changed the way we eat

Social media, social pressure, accessibility and availability and our notions of time pressures have changed how we view food, according to food writer Bee Wilson. She explores these changes her new book The Way We Eat Now.

The Current for June 24, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at renewed concerns for migrants at the U.S. border, after lawyers warned that children are being detained in terrible conditions; plus, we look at playgrounds designed for adults trying to reconnect with their inner child; and CBC podcast Uncover: The Village looks at disappearances in Toronto's gay community, dating back to the 1970s.

Adult playgrounds 'reignite' childhood joy, but is that a good thing?

A new indoor playground designed for adults has opened in Toronto, part of a trend gaining popularity worldwide. Despite being good fun, some experts say they can help adults deal with stress and emotional issues. Others say it's time we all just grew up a little. We hear both sides of the argument.

How Instagram saved the egg: Author argues social media has changed the way we eat

How Instagram saved the egg: Author argues social media has changed the way we eat

Friday June 21, 2019 Full Transcript

Full text transcript for June 21st episode.

How Instagram saved the egg: Author argues social media has changed the way we eat

Food writer Bee Wilson says that the food we eat has changed dramatically over two generations, and so has our relationship with it. Her new book explores how the pressures of contemporary life has left us all eating the same thing, but without really much time to eat it, and sometimes not even knowing what we're putting in our bodies.

There is fascism in the air around the world, says famed novelist Arundhati Roy

One of India's most celebrated writers, Arundhati Roy, says that "fascism is in the air" in her homeland, and warns that the same thing is happening all over the world.

Trump cancelling strike on Iran was both a warning, and an offer to negotiate: expert

After the downing of an American military drone, the U.S. planned limited strikes on Iran Thursday, and then abruptly cancelled them. We discuss tensions between the two countries, and fears that they could lead to outright hostilities.

There is fascism in the air around the world, says famed novelist Arundhati Roy

One of India's most celebrated writers, Arundhati Roy, says that "fascism is in the air" in her homeland, and warns that the same thing is happening all over the world.

Trump cancelling strike on Iran was both a warning, and an offer to negotiate: expert

After the downing of an American military drone, the U.S. planned limited strikes on Iran Thursday, and then abruptly cancelled them. We discuss tensions between the two countries, and fears that they could lead to outright hostilities.

The Current for June 21, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at the rising tensions between the U.S. and Iran; plus, we speak to a food writer about how our relationship with food has changed dramatically in the past 50 years; and finally, celebrated writer Arundhati Roy warns that fascism is on the rise in her native India, and across the world.

Thursday June 20, 2019 Full Transcript

Full text transcript for June 20th episode.

'Thank you for listening': Anna Maria Tremonti's goodbye speech in full

Anna Maria Tremonti bows out with a final essay on what journalism has meant to her, and still means in today's world.

Our humanity 'shines' when we connect: What Anna Maria Tremonti learned from hosting The Current

In her final show, Anna Maria Tremonti passes the microphone to Carol Off, to answer questions on her career before The Current; at the helm of the acclaimed weekday morning current affairs radio show; and what comes next.

Anna Maria Tremonti hosts her final edition of The Current

After 17 seasons on the air, Anna Maria Tremonti is hanging up the microphone as host of the CBC's flagship current affairs radio show, The Current. For her final outing, she hosted a special live show in the heart of the CBC Broadcast Centre in Toronto — featuring music, a live audience, special guests, and more.

Listen LIVE: Anna Maria Tremonti hosts her final edition of The Current

After 17 seasons on the air, Anna Maria Tremonti is hanging up the microphone as host of the CBC's flagship current affairs radio show, The Current. Listen to her last show, with a live audience at the CBC in Toronto, from 8:37 a.m. local time.