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Suicide shouldn't be 'normal' in Indigenous communities, says 2018 Massey Lecturer Tanya Talaga

For the 2018 CBC Massey Lectures, Indigenous journalist Tanya Talaga examined the devastating problem of youth suicide in Indigenous communities. She spoke to Anna Maria Tremonti about what she found.

'Nostalgia is not a vision': Campaigners lay out risks and rewards of Calgary Olympic bid

Calgarians go to the polls Tuesday, in a plebiscite on whether to pursue the bid for the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. The Current spoke to two people from either side of the debate.

'I wasn't going to die a slave': Dikgang Moseneke looks back at the struggle to end South African apartheid

Dikgang Moseneke was imprisoned on Robben Island when he was 15, where he befriended Nelson Mandela. After a lifetime fighting for justice, he says that Mandela's lessons still hold true in today's political climate.

New CBC podcast looks at the bombing of Canadian Pacific Flight 21

A bomb exploded on Canadian Pacific Flight 21 in 1965, killing all 52 people on board. The new season of CBC podcast Uncover offers insight into what happened — and why no one has ever been held responsible.

The Current for November 12, 2018

Today on The Current: We look at the pros and cons of Calgary's 2026 Olympic bid; a CBC podcast takes a fresh look at a legendary cold case; we talk to Dikgang Moseneke — who fought alongside Nelson Mandela — about justice; and Tanya Talaga, this year's Massey Lecturer, discusses the devastation of youth suicide in Indigenous communities.

Grocery store fire prompts panic-buying in Iqaluit, but not everyone can afford high prices, says activist

A fire at one of Iqaluit's only two large grocery stores has left the city's residents concerned about food shortages, but high food prices mean not everyone can afford to stock up, says a community activist.

How youth support staff are using their sleuthing skills to connect teens with family

Youth who find themselves at an emergency youth centre in St. Catherine's, Ont., have been taking part in a unique program in which staff scour government records and databases to find family members who have gone missing from the teens' lives.

U.K. surgeon gives thumbs down to medical students' lack of dexterity

A prominent British surgeon says he's concerned that medical students don't have the same manual dexterity as their predecessors. Have we turned our backs on our hands?

The Current for November 9, 2018

From how an Iqaluit grocery store fire highlights food insecurity in the North; to a U.K. surgeon raising concern over medical student's lack of dexterity; to an Ontario youth shelter bringing together family reunions ... This is The Current, with guest host Piya Chattopadhyay.

Survivors broke windows with barstools to escape gunman in California: reporter

Police said that 13 people died after a gunman opened fire at a country-and-western bar in southern California late Wednesday. The Current spoke to a reporter at the scene.

'Glee' over Tony Clement sexting scandal minimizes victims facing similar blackmail, says advocate

Those cheering the resignation of Tony Clement in a sexting scandal are losing sight of the fact that similar extortion attempts happen all the time, and there must be a hard line against blackmail, says advocate Julie Lalonde.

U.S. voters would be 'stunned' to know midterms monitored by Russian officials: author

The presence of two Russian politicians as official monitors in the U.S. midterms, but the problems they're trying to catch start long before polling day, says author Carol Anderson.

The ozone layer is healing — what can that success teach us in the fight against climate change?

A UN report suggests the ozone layer is healing itself — thanks in large part to the Montreal Protocol signed three decades ago. The news is giving activists hope that in the fight against climate change.

The Current for November 8, 2018

From a California bar shooting that left 13 dead including the gunman; to questions raised around digital privacy, power and authority in the Tony Clement case; to a new report with glimmering hope on fixing the ozone layer; to the troubling voting problems that plagued the U.S. midterms ... This is The Current.

U.S. midterm results won't deter Trump from 'bombastic, over-the-top' style, says strategist

As the dust begins to settle on the U.S. midterms, strategists from both sides of the divide explore what the results mean for the next two years of U.S. President Donald Trump's term.

U.S. midterms marred by 'ethical dilemmas' and voter suppression, says Black Votes Matter co-founder

In the aftermath of Tuesday's U.S. midterm elections, Black Votes Matter co-founder Cliff Albright says the bar for getting out the vote is even higher given the alleged voter suppression tactics at work.

After U.S. midterms, voters describe friends, families drifting apart over political divide

Heated rhetoric in the U.S. midterm campaign has increased divisions between voters, including among families and friends.

The Current for November 7, 2018

Anna Maria Tremonti hosts a special edition of The Current looking at the results of the U.S. midterm elections; from how grassroots organizers feel about the outcome, to strategists predicting what the next two years leading up to the U.S. Presidential election might look like; to relationships that are broken over a political divide.

How Trump's immigration rhetoric is playing out in Texas

The Current's Anna Maria Tremonti went to Texas to find out how President Donald Trump's rhetoric around the southern border is affecting or strengthening voter loyalty.

Fed up with their liberal home states, U.S. conservatives find a place they can belong in Texas

Paul and Brenda Chabot are conservatives who left California for political reasons, and are now helping like-minded families to leave liberal blue states for red ones.

Saskatchewan's changes to trespassing law target First Nations community: FSIN Vice-Chief

A new push to combat rural crime in Saskatchewan is welcomed by some but Indigenous communities are raising red flags, calling the proposed changes to trespass legislation dangerous and a violation of treaty rights.

The Current for November 6, 2018

In the lead-up to the U.S. midterm elections, Anna Maria Tremonti visits Texas— meeting people who help Republicans escape blues states to exploring how Texans view issues like immigration, economy and President Trump; plus why some people are raising red flags over a new push to combat rural crime in Saskatchewan ... This is The Current.

After Parkland shooting, students 'marched for their lives': Now they're urging youth to vote in U.S. midterms

Survivors of the Parkland school shooting started a political movement in the U.S. to increase youth voter participation. It's unclear how successful they will be.

Trauma survivors 'can change society,' says psychologist helping Yazidi survivors of ISIS

Western society doesn't understand what trauma survivors can achieve, says Dr Jan Kizilhan, a Kurdish-German psychologist who helps Yazidi survivors of ISIS sexual slavery.

Do fish feel pain? Scientists are divided on the answer

For centuries, the consensus has been that fish don't feel pain. A growing body of research suggests to some scientists that fish can indeed feel pain, but not everyone in the field agrees.