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One Bullet

Fatal sniper bullet was 'only solution' to end 2004 Union Station standoff, negotiator says

On the morning of Aug. 25, 2004, an armed man with a long history of spousal abuse took a stranger hostage in front of Union Station in downtown Toronto. The gunman had just tried to kill his estranged wife at a nearby food court and was cornered by police in a tense standoff that captivated Canadians and ended with a sniper’s bullet.

We want to hear from you: How has gun violence affected you and your community?

One Bullet is a CBC investigation into the impact of gun violence in our country, one bullet, one person at a time.

From 46 to 77 years old, these women are defying age to pursue a figure skating dream

On a whim, a tight-knit squad of adult female figure skaters in Kelowna, B.C., decided to try and compete in the 2018 ISU Adult Figure Skating Competition in Germany. We heard from two of the women about the bond the group formed on the ice, and a journey that was both life-affirming and exhausting.

'Dark times ahead,' but Brexit will be worth it in the long term, says financier

After British Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal was defeated in parliament Tuesday, what's next for the troubled process? And what does it all mean for the people living in uncertainty?

The Current for January 16, 2019

Today on The Current: We continue our One Bullet series with a look back at a dramatic hostage situation outside Union Station in Toronto in 2004; plus, we explore what the defeat of British Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal means for the troubled process; and we talk to a tight-knit squad of adult female figure skaters in Kelowna, B.C., who decided on a whim to compete in the 2018 ISU Adult Figure Skating Competition in Germany.
One Bullet

8 years ago, a retired RCMP officer shot his spouse — and shattered multiple lives in the process

Eight years after she was shot to death by her common-law spouse, Lynn Kalmring’s homicide still weighs on friends, family and the lawyer who defended her killer.

Jurors in traumatic trials need counselling and support, not just 'a coffee and a handshake': advocate

Jurors are often expected to examine extremely violent and disturbing cases, but despite a report from the justice committee urging change, advocates argue there is still a lack of counselling and support.

Cabinet shuffle suggests government 'reacts to change' instead of changing itself, says columnist

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will meet with his newly reshuffled cabinet in Quebec later this week — and the federal election this fall is sure to be on the agenda. We gather a political panel to discuss how the Liberal government is performing in Canada and on the world stage, and what the political shakeup could mean with an election looming.

The Current for January 15, 2019

Today on The Current: We continue our One Bullet series by exploring the murder of Lynn Kalmring, who was shot to death by her common-law partner in 2011; plus, we look at the limited counselling and support available to jurors who take on traumatic trials; and our political panel discusses the latest Liberal cabinet shuffle and the looming fall election.
One Bullet

Unsolved death of Toronto high school basketball star leaves mother still pleading for a witness 2 decades on

Nearly two decades after a promising Toronto high school basketball star was gunned down, police are still waiting for someone to come forward and identify the shooter.

'Moment of truth' nears for Brexit, but not everyone is worried, says academic

In Britain this week, a divided House of Commons will vote on Theresa May's Brexit deal. We take a look at what's at stake.

Polygamy is happening in Canada's Muslim community, but convictions are rare, says reporter

As some women in Canada’s Muslim community are speaking out against polygamous marriages in their community, a CBC reporter investigating the issue for The Fifth Estate says charges and convictions related to the practice are “extremely rare” in Canada.

The Current for January 14, 2019

Today on The Current: We start our weeklong series on gun violence in Canada with one mother's decades-long wait for justice, following the death of her son; plus, we hear from Canadian Muslim women who are fighting to end polygamy in their community; and we get an update on what's happening in Britain, at the start of a momentous week in the roller-coaster that is Brexit.

U.S. company trying to sue Canada over coal phase-out made a bad bet, says academic

Canadian plans to stop using coal have left one U.S. company crying foul. Westmoreland Coal owns seven Canadian coal mines, and claims that it should be receiving part of the $2 billion in government compensation being offered to the Canadian companies being told to phase out operations.

New CBC doc 'Pugly: A Pug's Life' looks at the short-snouted pups and their owners

Pug owners say they're never more than a pug-hug away from a better day, and if you take a peek at Instagram, you'll find plenty of people who adore their pug-faced pooches. It's clear that pugs' popularity is on the rise, but so too are the health problems associated with the breed. We take a look inside the world of pugs and those who love them.

Signal from deep space is probably not aliens, just 'exotic physics': prof

The Canadian telescope CHIME has found a repeating fast radio burst in deep space, only the second of its kind to be discovered. We look at some of the theories around what causes the phenomenon — and why some scientists are cautioning that it's probably not aliens.

The Current for January 11, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at a U.S. company claiming it deserves compensation over Canada’s plans to phase out coal; plus we take a look inside the world of pugs and those who love them; and what could be causing repeating fast radio bursts like the one detected by the Canadian telescope CHIME.

Trump's border wall will cut through National Butterfly Center, devastating wildlife, says director

We look at how the proposed U.S.-Mexico border wall will affect people living along its route, and explore the environmental impact that the plans will have on one particular nature centre.

Reporter who covered Robert Dziekanski's death says there's more to the story than 'four bad-apple cops'

Long-time CBC journalist Curt Petrovich covered the death of Robert Dziekanski in 2007. The Polish immigrant was Tasered by RCMP officers in Vancouver airport, but Petrovich says there's more to the story than a narrative of "four bad apple cops." Now he's written a book about Dziekanski, and the four RCMP officers present that night, and whether justice has been served.

Should the advice in the Canadian Food Guide be taken with a pinch of salt?

We look at the new Canada Food Guide and examine how business interests have influenced our nutrition over the decades, since the first guide in the 1940s.

The Current for January 10, 2019

Today on The Current: We talk to some of the people living along the U.S.-Mexico border, asking how they feel about the prospect of a border wall in their back yard; plus we look at the new Canada Food Guide and look at the history of commercial influence on our nutrition; and long-time CBC journalist Curt Petrovich looks back at the 2007 death of Robert Dziekanski, and argues there's more to the story than the narrative of "four bad apple cops."
CBC Investigates

This First Nation produces clean water. So why are so many residents afraid to drink it?

In some ways, Garden Hill First Nation in northern Manitoba is a success story. The community has no boil-water advisories. Its water treatment plant produces clean drinking water. So why do many residents refuse to drink their tap water? And why do others have no taps at all? CBC News investigates.

U.S. scientist says he tried to stop Chinese researcher from making first gene-edited babies

How did a scientist in China pull off his experiment using gene-editing technology on embryos without anyone knowing, and what impact has he had on the ethics of CRISPR research?

Trump's border wall 'rhetoric does not add up,' says immigration journalist

Following U.S. President Donald Trump's prime-time Oval Office speech last night insisting a southern border wall is needed, two journalists discuss the efficacy of his message and fact-check his claims.

The Current for January 9, 2019

Today on The Current: We talk to two journalists about whether U.S. President Donald Trump's prime-time speech Tuesday night will help him get the border wall he wants; Garden Hill, a community in northern Manitoba, along with its sister reserves, are still facing a daily battle to ensure a steady supply of safe, clean water and how did a scientist in China pull off his experiment using gene editing technology on embryos without anyone knowing?