Latest

The Current for July 16, 2019

Today on The Current: We discuss President Trump’s tweet that four U.S. Congresswomen of colour could “go back” to their own countries; plus, we look at what to do when rats reach infestation levels in our homes and cities; and we continue our summer podcast season with episode seven of award-winning CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

Space archeologist says heritage protections needed to stop people trampling the moon landing site

Fifty years after Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin first set foot on the moon, some scientists are arguing that we should preserve our space heritage the way we would any historical site on Earth. We look at the push to protect historical sites that are out of this world.

What was that podcast I heard on The Current?

All summer long, The Current is bringing you the best from CBC podcasts. Here's what we're playing on air, and where to find more episodes online.

The Current for July 15, 2019

Today on The Current: New Orleans may have been spared the worst of Hurricane Barry, but is the threat over?; plus, we hear about a push to protect places important to human history — on the moon; and we continue our summer podcast season with award-winning CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

After deadly 2018 heatwave, Montreal scientists are working on science of keeping cool

We visit a heat lab in Montreal, where scientists are testing the tricks we all use to keep cool. They're looking for the science behind how we cope when the mercury is rising.

Climate change is making flights more turbulent, meteorologist says. Here's what to do about it

More than three dozen people were injured when Air Canada Flight 33 suddenly hit clear air turbulence early this week. Paul Williams, an atmospheric science professor at the University of Reading, warns changes in the jet stream are 'completely invisible' and almost impossible to detect.

The Current for July 12, 2019

Today on The Current: We visit a heat lab to look at the science behind how we cope when the mercury is rising; plus, we discuss whether climate change could make violent turbulence a more common problem; and we continue our summer podcast season with award-winning CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

Jeffrey Epstein case suggests a 'panoply of different powerful men covering for each other': Molly Jong-Fast

Writer Molly Jong-Fast thinks the allegations of sex trafficking against wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein point to a wider problem of power and corruption in society. "This has been a sort of panoply of different powerful men covering for each other," she said.

Flying fish? Migrating salmon trapped in Fraser River Canyon could be helicoptered out, says biologist

A landslide has trapped thousands of salmon in B.C.'s Fraser River Canyon, preventing the fish from making it to their spawning ground. Scientists are racing to find a way to free them — including the option of using helicopters to airlift the fish.

The Current for July 11, 2019

Today on The Current: Why did it take so long for allegations of sex trafficking against Jeffrey Epstein to come to light?; plus, helicopters may be sent in to arilift thousands of salmon trapped behind a landslide in B.C.'s Fraser River Canyon; and we listen to episode four of CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

Conservative premiers' unity means the system is working 'in a weird and twisted way,' says columnist

Our national affairs panel discusses what to expect from the provincial premiers' annual meeting, and what it can tell us about the upcoming federal election. Political columnist Murray Mandryk says that provincial pushback against federal policies reflects voter concerns.

The Current for July 10, 2019

Today on The Current: Our national affairs panel discusses the premiers' annual meeting; and we bring you episode three of CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM, where we learn about Keith Raniere's early life, from people who knew him intimately.

Protecting right whales needs a more proactive approach: researcher

Three right whales were spotted tangled in fishing gear this week. We ask Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson if enough is being done to protect them, and speak to a frustrated researcher who argues that it isn't.

The Current for July 9, 2019

Today on The Current: We discuss whether the federal government is doing enough to protect right whales; and we listen to episode two of the award-winning CBC investigative podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

A decades-old missing persons case continues to haunt Ontario's cottage country

An enigmatic woman named Joan Lawrence became a local legend in the community of Huntsville, Ont., where she became known as "the cat lady." That legend became a mystery when she disappeared 20 years ago. Now a new CBC podcast, Uncover: The Cat Lady Case, takes another look at her story.

Separation of families at Canadian border is creating 'invisibly detained children': advocate

We explore the impact on children being separated from their parents at border crossings — not just in the U.S., but around the world.

'A compromised life is worth living': The late Ing Wong-Ward's interview with Anna Maria Tremonti

Ing Wong-Ward, a disability rights advocate and former CBC journalist, died Saturday from complications of colon cancer. While in palliative care in 2018, she spoke to Anna Maria Tremonti about her fight to make her remaining time meaningful — and to help others to do the same.

The Current for July 8, 2019

Today on The Current: We explore the impact on children being separated from their parents at border crossings — not just in the U.S., but around the world; plus, we take a sneak peek at the next series of CBC podcast Uncover, about the disappearance of an enigmatic "cat lady" in Ontario 20 years ago; and we listen back to another series of Uncover, about the alleged sex cult NXIVM.

Migrants killed in Libyan airstrike were waiting to go home, says UN worker

Migrants stopped from entering Europe are often detained in Libya, but an airstrike on a detention centre near Tripoli on Tuesday has renewed safety concerns. We discuss the dangers for people in detention, and ask whether there's a political will to address them.

The Current for July 5, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at concerns for the safety of migrants held in detention centres in Libya, after an airstrike Tuesday killed dozens; and we conclude the series of CBC podcast Uncover: The Village, which looks at disappearances in Toronto's gay community, dating back to the 1970s.

Amid sexual assault allegation, E. Jean Carroll says Trump is just 'one of 21 hideous men' in her life

Last month, advice columnist E. Jean Carroll accused U.S. President Donald Trump of sexually assaulting her in the mid-1990s. While he denies the allegation, she tells us why she waited so long to make it.

Canada needs to do more to combat disinformation in upcoming election: ex-justice minister

Canada needs to do more to guard against potential meddling in the upcoming federal election by cracking down on social media giants, says former justice minister Allan Rock. 

The Current for July 4, 2019

Today on The Current: We speak to advice columnist E. Jean Carroll about her allegation that she was sexually assaulted by U.S. President Donald Trump; plus, former federal justice minister Allan Rock on guarding against potential foreign interference in Canada’s fall election; and CBC podcast Uncover: The Village looks at disappearances in Toronto's gay community, dating back to the 1970s.

Newspaper editorial cartoons face 'existential threat' from advertisers, online memes: artist

Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Nick Anderson says that newspapers are growing increasingly "gun-shy" about running editorial cartoons about controversial topics, thanks in part to growing pressure from advertisers, shrinking newsroom budgets and online meme culture.

The Current for July 3, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at how political cartoons are changing in an age of memes and shrinking newsrooms; plus, CBC podcast Uncover: The Village looks at disappearances in Toronto's gay community, dating back to the 1970s.