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Refusing to be ignored, Roberta Bondar took up space as Canada's 1st female astronaut

When she was a girl, Roberta Bondar dreamed of going into space. But at the time, every astronaut she saw on the evening news was a man. She resolved to make sure she was so qualified to join them that no one could ignore her — so she got four degrees.

Behind the scenes of the moon landing: NASA did incredible work, but almost forgot the flag, says author

Author Charles Fishman recounts the amazing behind-the-scenes efforts to get Apollo 11 to the moon 50 years ago. His new book, One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission That Flew Us to the Moon, takes a look back on that achievement.

Astrophysicist hopes history's trailblazing women can help young girls look to the stars

Astrophysicist Jo Dunkley worries that as our understanding of the universe gets more complex, people are daunted by trying to understand outer space. She wants everyone to look to the stars, especially young girls who could be inspired by trailblazing female scientists that came before them.

The Current for July 18, 2019

Today on The Current: We speak to the author of a new book about the incredible behind-the-scenes efforts to get Apollo 11 to the moon; plus, Canadian astronaut Dr. Roberta Bondar tells us what it was like to go into space, and why she wants to see more women make the same journey; and we listen back to Anna Maria Tremonti's conversation with an astrophysicist who wants us to consider the deep mysteries of the universe, and some of the trailblazing women who unlocked them.

What was that podcast I heard on The Current?

All summer long, The Current is bringing you the best from CBC podcasts. Here's what we're playing on air, and where to find more episodes online.

Nuking the oilsands: Why Ernest Manning wanted nuclear weapons to jumpstart Alberta's oil industry

Darren Dochuk's new book, Anointed with Oil, looks at the connection between Christianity and the oil industry, including how late premier Ernest Manning opened up the oilsands for development in the late 1960s. Dochuk talks us through that history, including an aborted plan to set off nuclear weapons under the oilsands.

Social media can be a 'toxic space' for young people, says woman who took 2-year hiatus

A new study looks at how social media is affecting teenagers' mental health. We talk to two young people about how they use those platforms, and what they do to manage the potentially harmful effects.

The Current for July 17, 2019

Today on The Current: We speak to young people about how social media affects their mental health; then, we speak to author Darren Dochuk about the links between Christianity and the oil industry; plus, we look at how James Bond fans are reacting to the news that the new 007 will be a black woman; and we continue our summer podcast season with award-winning CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

Want to fight the hordes of rats in our cities? Start with the data, expert says

Our cities may be an appealing habitat for rats, but what can we do when their numbers reach infestation levels? We hear from two women whose homes have fallen victim to a network of rat tunnels, and an expert who says our approach to eradicating them might be part of the problem.

'Call a spade a spade': Trump tweets about congresswomen were racist: liberal activist

U.S. President Donald Trump drew global criticism after tweeting that four congresswomen of colour should "go back" to the countries they came from, but many Republicans remained silent. We discuss the controversy with people on both sides of the political divide.

The Current for July 16, 2019

Today on The Current: We discuss President Trump’s tweet that four U.S. Congresswomen of colour could “go back” to their own countries; plus, we look at what to do when rats reach infestation levels in our homes and cities; and we continue our summer podcast season with episode seven of award-winning CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

Space archeologist says heritage protections needed to stop people trampling the moon landing site

Fifty years after Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin first set foot on the moon, some scientists are arguing that we should preserve our space heritage the way we would any historical site on Earth. We look at the push to protect historical sites that are out of this world.

The Current for July 15, 2019

Today on The Current: New Orleans may have been spared the worst of Hurricane Barry, but is the threat over?; plus, we hear about a push to protect places important to human history — on the moon; and we continue our summer podcast season with award-winning CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

After deadly 2018 heatwave, Montreal scientists are working on science of keeping cool

We visit a heat lab in Montreal, where scientists are testing the tricks we all use to keep cool. They're looking for the science behind how we cope when the mercury is rising.

Climate change is making flights more turbulent, meteorologist says. Here's what to do about it

More than three dozen people were injured when Air Canada Flight 33 suddenly hit clear air turbulence early this week. Paul Williams, an atmospheric science professor at the University of Reading, warns changes in the jet stream are 'completely invisible' and almost impossible to detect.

The Current for July 12, 2019

Today on The Current: We visit a heat lab to look at the science behind how we cope when the mercury is rising; plus, we discuss whether climate change could make violent turbulence a more common problem; and we continue our summer podcast season with award-winning CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

Jeffrey Epstein case suggests a 'panoply of different powerful men covering for each other': Molly Jong-Fast

Writer Molly Jong-Fast thinks the allegations of sex trafficking against wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein point to a wider problem of power and corruption in society. "This has been a sort of panoply of different powerful men covering for each other," she said.

Flying fish? Migrating salmon trapped in Fraser River Canyon could be helicoptered out, says biologist

A landslide has trapped thousands of salmon in B.C.'s Fraser River Canyon, preventing the fish from making it to their spawning ground. Scientists are racing to find a way to free them — including the option of using helicopters to airlift the fish.

The Current for July 11, 2019

Today on The Current: Why did it take so long for allegations of sex trafficking against Jeffrey Epstein to come to light?; plus, helicopters may be sent in to arilift thousands of salmon trapped behind a landslide in B.C.'s Fraser River Canyon; and we listen to episode four of CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

Conservative premiers' unity means the system is working 'in a weird and twisted way,' says columnist

Our national affairs panel discusses what to expect from the provincial premiers' annual meeting, and what it can tell us about the upcoming federal election. Political columnist Murray Mandryk says that provincial pushback against federal policies reflects voter concerns.

The Current for July 10, 2019

Today on The Current: Our national affairs panel discusses the premiers' annual meeting; and we bring you episode three of CBC podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM, where we learn about Keith Raniere's early life, from people who knew him intimately.

Protecting right whales needs a more proactive approach: researcher

Three right whales were spotted tangled in fishing gear this week. We ask Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson if enough is being done to protect them, and speak to a frustrated researcher who argues that it isn't.

The Current for July 9, 2019

Today on The Current: We discuss whether the federal government is doing enough to protect right whales; and we listen to episode two of the award-winning CBC investigative podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM.

A decades-old missing persons case continues to haunt Ontario's cottage country

An enigmatic woman named Joan Lawrence became a local legend in the community of Huntsville, Ont., where she became known as "the cat lady." That legend became a mystery when she disappeared 20 years ago. Now a new CBC podcast, Uncover: The Cat Lady Case, takes another look at her story.

Separation of families at Canadian border is creating 'invisibly detained children': advocate

We explore the impact on children being separated from their parents at border crossings — not just in the U.S., but around the world.