The Current

Latest

Q&A

From business to public space: How COVID-19 could alter our economy for good

The COVID-19 pandemic has decimated many sectors of the economy, but it’s also paving the way for change — from the way we work, to the way we live. We look at the possible long-term effects those changes could have on our economy.

How an old tradition is helping people weather the pandemic's financial storm

As Canadians look to weather the financial storm caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, some are turning to a tried-and-true tradition called susu to save money — and help one another.

Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield on the fate of downtown office culture

For many, the novelty of #WFHIS (work from home, in sweatpants) has given way to questions about whether the era of the downtown office will ever return. Stewart Butterfield, CEO of business communications company Slack, discusses how his company met demand when the working world went remote.

Remaking a living: Surviving the COVID-19 economy, a special edition of The Current

In a special edition, The Current looks at the impact of COVID-19 on the economy, and how Canadian workers and businesses are adapting to immense change.

'I'm deathly afraid': Long-term care residents fear emotional neglect, understaffing as 2nd wave looms

With winter looming and the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic gaining momentum across Canada, long-term care home residents say they fear their physical health is being guarded at the expense of their mental and emotional well-being.

The Current for Oct. 28, 2020

Today on The Current: Long-term care home residents voice COVID-19 fears as winter looms, Nate Hegyi cycled almost 1,300 kilometres to explore the U.S.’s Great Divide, A Nova Scotia neighbourhood parking dispute that escalated into assault convictions, New CBC podcast The Notorious NEP.

Doctor who helped people meditate through pandemic fears diagnosed with stage 4 cancer

After finding a lump on his neck in May, Dr. James Maskalyk has been processing a diagnosis of cancer in the midst of the pandemic.

The Current for Oct. 27, 2020

Today on The Current: The rise of QAnon in Canada, Dr. James Maskalyk on the transition from physician to patient, New book celebrates women at the forefront of the climate crisis.

'This is not the country you believe it is,' Neskantaga First Nation chief says amid water crisis

If Prime Minister Justin Trudeau were to visit Neskantaga First Nation in northern Ontario, where there is no running water, he would see citizens “in his backyard” living in Third-world conditions, says the community’s chief.
Road to November

Residents of the 'most racist town in America' say they're working hard to shake that reputation

Our Road to November series stops in Harrison, Ark., dubbed "the most racist town in America." We talk to residents who say that isn't true, and get their take on how issues around racism are playing out in the U.S. presidential election.

Road to November takes listeners down the Mississippi River, all the way to polling day

The Current's series Road to November is a virtual trip down the Mississippi River from Minnesota to Louisiana, to meet some of the people whose lives will be shaped by the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

War reporter Clarissa Ward remembers her first brush with death, and realizing she couldn't save the world

Clarissa Ward remembers her first brush with death in a conflict zone, and how it taught her to weigh those risks, and why she was taking them, more carefully.

The Current for Oct. 26, 2020

Today on The Current: Neskantaga First Nation evacuated over water concerns, Road to November: Arkansas and the 'most racist town in America,' Clarissa Ward on the mental health impact of reporting from the front lines.

Students call for systemic change in wake of N-word controversy at University of Ottawa

A University of Ottawa professor's controversial use of the N-word during class demonstrates the need for human rights boards to be created at universities across Canada, says a Black student who was carded on the school's campus last year.

Rhiannon Giddens on making art during a pandemic, and how music bridges divides

Grammy Award-winning musician Rhiannon Giddens says the pandemic is forcing artists to re-examine why they make art in the first place.

The Current for Oct. 23, 2020

Today on The Current: Unpacking the last 2020 U.S. presidential debate, What it's like being a Black university student in Canada, Grammy-winning musician Rhiannon Giddens on race, music and the banjo

Pope's stance on same-sex unions an important step for Catholic Church: priest

The pope’s endorsement of same-sex civil unions is a “highly significant” change in tone for the Vatican that could help change the way church leaders around the world approach the topic, says a Jesuit priest who has made supporting LGBT Catholics a cornerstone of his work.
Road to November

U.S. election is a 'now-or-never' moment, say young voters worried about country they'll inherit post-pandemic

In Tennessee, young voters are concerned about the country and economy they'll inherit after the pandemic, but not all agree on who is the right candidate to lead the country through it.

Road to November takes listeners down the Mississippi River, all the way to polling day

The Current's series Road to November is a virtual trip down the Mississippi River from Minnesota to Louisiana, to meet some of the people whose lives will be shaped by the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

The Current for Oct. 22, 2020

Today on The Current: Staying fit through a COVID-19 winter; Road to November: Tennessee, and what’s important to young voters, Pope Francis endorses same-sex civil unions, Google faces antitrust lawsuit.

The pandemic is forcing educators to rethink how they evaluate students. Here's why

As high schools across the country scrap exams because of the COVID-19 pandemic, some experts say now is the time to re-evaluate what those tests look like, to ensure they serve all students.

As confidence vote looms, do Liberals want an election, or a distraction?

Our national affairs panel discusses the possibility of a snap federal election, and what might be behind the Liberal federal government's move to call a confidence vote.

Tim Robbins on satirizing Trump, and the time he turned him away from a party

Tim Robbins new satirical podcast Bobbo Supreme follows a fictional, tyrannical U.S. president in frantic re-election bid. He says that while U.S. President Donald Trump may have killed parody, he has not killed satire.

The Current for Oct. 21, 2020

Today on The Current: Our national affairs panel on a possible snap election, pandemic fatigue and Nova Scotia fisheries dispute, Tim Robbins on his new satirical podcast, Debating the value of exams, André Picard on the latest in fight against COVID-19

How promoting social connection could help combat suicide among rural men

Older men living in rural areas need better access to culturally relevant programs to stem the risk of gun-related harm, says the lead author of a new study on firearm-related injuries and deaths in Ontario.

now