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Anna Maria Tremonti hosts her final edition of The Current

After 17 seasons on the air, Anna Maria Tremonti is hanging up the microphone as host of the CBC's flagship current affairs radio show, The Current. For her final outing, she hosted a special live show in the heart of the CBC Broadcast Centre in Toronto — featuring music, a live audience, special guests, and more.

Our humanity 'shines' when we connect: What Anna Maria Tremonti learned from hosting The Current

In her final show, Anna Maria Tremonti passes the microphone to Carol Off, to answer questions on her career before The Current; at the helm of the acclaimed weekday morning current affairs radio show; and what comes next.

'Thank you for listening': Anna Maria Tremonti's goodbye speech in full

Anna Maria Tremonti bows out with a final essay on what journalism has meant to her, and still means in today's world.

How to download a podcast

If you love switching on your radio but you've never so much as browsed the massive digital library of podcasts, your ears are in for a treat. We're here to walk you through it in a few simple steps.

Trump cancelling strike on Iran was both a warning, and an offer to negotiate: expert

After the downing of an American military drone, the U.S. planned limited strikes on Iran Thursday, and then abruptly cancelled them. We discuss tensions between the two countries, and fears that they could lead to outright hostilities.

How Instagram saved the egg: Author argues social media has changed the way we eat

Food writer Bee Wilson says that the food we eat has changed dramatically over two generations, and so has our relationship with it. Her new book explores how the pressures of contemporary life has left us all eating the same thing, but without really much time to eat it, and sometimes not even knowing what we're putting in our bodies.

There is fascism in the air around the world, says famed novelist Arundhati Roy

One of India's most celebrated writers, Arundhati Roy, says that "fascism is in the air" in her homeland, and warns that the same thing is happening all over the world.

The Current for June 21, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at the rising tensions between the U.S. and Iran; plus, we speak to a food writer about how our relationship with food has changed dramatically in the past 50 years; and finally, celebrated writer Arundhati Roy warns that fascism is on the rise in her native India, and across the world.

Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Neil Harbisson, the cyborg

As her time at The Current comes to a close, Anna Maria Tremonti looks back at some of the most memorable conversations from her 17 seasons as the show’s host.

Pipeline debates a sign of polarizing election campaign to come, says columnist

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the approval of the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, and our weekly national affairs panellists weigh in on this latest twist in the long-running fight, including how it might shape the fall election.

Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Paul Salopek the pilgrim

As her time on The Current comes to a close, Anna Maria Tremonti revisits her most memorable conversations from over the years. This time, she follows up with a guest who’s been one of the most “fascinating and inspiring” people she’s spoken to: Paul Salopek, who’s been travelling the world on foot since 2013.

The Current for June 19, 2019

Today on The Current: Our national affairs panel weighs in on the federal government's Trans Mountain pipeline decision; then, we revisit the only interview Anna Maria Tremonti has ever conducted with a cyborg; and checking in with Paul Salopek, who is travelling the world by foot.

What these Canadians want to see in Ottawa's final call on the Trans Mountain pipeline

The debate over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which would triple the amount of diluted bitumen and other oil products moving from Alberta to Burnaby for international shipment, has pitted individuals, ideologies — and even provinces — against one another.

Are saltwater beavers a thing? Scientists observe Canadian critters in potentially deadly habitat

Our documentary A Salty Tail explores beaver behaviour that is puzzling scientists. Canada's national animal is being discovered in saltwater zones, despite the long-held understanding that the rodents only live in freshwater. Are saltwater beavers actually a thing?

Quebec's new immigration law could be attempt to win more powers from Ottawa: expert

Bill 9, the newly passed immigration legislation in Quebec, would allow the government to cancel thousands of in-progress immigration applications and impose a values test that would-be immigrants will need to pass in order to become a permanent resident.

Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: The Bosnian women who bore children of war

As her time at The Current comes to a close, Anna Maria Tremonti looks back at some of the most memorable conversations from her 17 seasons as the show’s host.

The Current for June 18, 2019

Today on The Current: Quebec’s new immigration bill will negate thousands of immigration applications currently underway — we speak to a woman who will have to start over; then, a documentary seeks to answer some gnawing questions about Canada’s national animal, the beaver, and whether they can live in saltwater; and finally, 20 years after the Bosnian war, Anna Maria Tremonti returned to Sarajevo and spoke with two women about the children they bore after the violence.

Time is 'ripe' for big businesses to get behind Canadian basketball: Men's national team GM

Two million fans are expected to show up to the Raptors' victory parade in downtown Toronto Monday morning. That kind of interest should lead to corporate sponsorship that can be used to grow the game, according to leading figures in the sport.

Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Esther the Wonder Pig

As her time at The Current comes to a close, Anna Maria Tremonti looks back at some of the most memorable conversations from her 17 years as the show’s host.

Turn away from social media and join 'Team Human,' urges author

In his new book Team Human, author and digital theorist Douglas Rushkoff says that people thrive by making meaningful connections with one another, but technology like social media networks are actively working towards weakening those connections for their own purposes.

The Current for June 17, 2019

Today on The Current: We hear from Canadians who are dropping everything to celebrate the Raptors; then, author Douglas Rushkoff calls on everyone to resist technology and reclaim our human connection; and finally, we listen back to one of Anna Maria Tremonti’s most memorable interviews: Esther the Wonder Pig.

Veteran journalist Anna Maria Tremonti reveals the key to good interviews — and her love of opera

Anna Maria Tremonti will sign off of The Current for one last time after 17 seasons in the host chair. Ahead of her departure, she took phone calls about her career, journalism and the challenges facing Canadians on Cross Country Checkup.

Raptors fan ditches prom to watch his team 'make history' in NBA championships

Raptors fans across the world are waking up to the team's first day as NBA champions. We look back at a night of victory and raucous celebration, and what the sacrifices that some fans have made on the road here.

'This is just the beginning': Raptors' win signals new chapter in Canadian basketball

The Raptors' first-ever NBA title could go a long way toward changing the future of the sport in this country as more young people across the country are enticed to take part.

Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: The man who shared his $25M lottery jackpot

As her time at The Current comes to a close, Anna Maria Tremonti looks back at some of the most memorable conversations from her 17 seasons as the show’s host.

What these Canadians want to see in Ottawa's final call on the Trans Mountain pipeline

The debate over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which would triple the amount of diluted bitumen and other oil products moving from Alberta to Burnaby for international shipment, has pitted individuals, ideologies — and even provinces — against one another.