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Protests in Hong Kong are a source of discord for families here in Canada, says activist

The protests in Hong Kong are causing divisions among families and friends in the diaspora. We talk to two Hong Kong Canadians about what kinds of conversations they're having at the dinner table.

What was that podcast I heard on The Current?

All summer long, The Current is bringing you the best from CBC podcasts. Here's what we're playing on air, and where to find more episodes online.

The Current for August 22, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at how protests in Hong Kong are causing divisions among families and friends in the diaspora; and we listen in on a family reunion in episode 9 of CBC podcast Finding Cleo.

Your smartphone is ruining your sex life, says renowned sex therapist Dr. Ruth

Dr. Ruth Westheimer has been offering advice on sex and intimacy for decades, and she's not done yet. She speaks to Anna Maria Tremonti about a new documentary on her life and career, and why she thinks our smartphones are ruining our sex lives.

Protecting jobs is no defence, conservative strategist says in wake of SNC-Lavalin ethics report

Our national affairs panel looks at how the SNC-Lavalin report could affect the fall election, and whether the prime minister's defence that he was looking out for jobs holds water.

The Current for August 21, 2019

Today on The Current: Our national affairs panel looks at the SNC-Lavalin report, and whether Maxime Bernier’s party should be included in the election debates; plus, we talk to renowned sex therapist Dr. Ruth Westheimer, who says that at 91, she’s not done giving advice just yet; and we listen to episode 8 of CBC podcast Finding Cleo.

'I'm myself now': What it's like to come out as gay later in life

Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson spoke openly about his sexuality for the first time in a column in the Ottawa Citizen. Coming out of the closet is an intensely personal decision no matter what the age. We speak to two people who, like Watson, came out later in life.

Canadian-made Ebola vaccine could have saved more lives if research was funded earlier, microbiologist says

A Canadian microbiologist, who helped develop the Ebola vaccine currently being used to save lives in Congo, is frustrated because he believes it could have been used to save more lives if governments and pharmaceutical companies committed to its funding and support years earlier.

The Current for August 20, 2019

Today on The Current: Why some people, like Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson, came out about their sexuality later in life; a microbiologist's frustration that a life-saving Ebola vaccine could have saved more lives if funding and support came years earlier; and we continue our CBC Podcasts series with Episode 7 of Finding Cleo.

Shaming people into fighting climate change won't work, says scientist

As Greta Thunberg sails across the Atlantic to highlight the climate impact of flying, we're asking whether the "flight shame" movement helps — or hurts — climate activism. One expert says inspiring people is a more effective way to create change.

The Current for August 19, 2019

Today on The Current: We’re asking whether the “flight shame” movement helps — or hurts — climate activism; and we continue our CBC podcast series with Episode 6 of Finding Cleo.

From the fall of Rome to gin and tonic: How the mosquito 'shaped our history'

Author Timothy Winegard tells about his new book The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator. It's abuzz with facts about the insects, including the role they played in creating gin and tonic, and how the Nazis tried to utilize them in the Second World War.

Some summer camps are using facial-recognition tech to give parents 'a glimpse of life at camp'

Some summer camps are partnering with companies like Bunk1 and Waldo Photos, which use facial recognition, to offer parents a steady stream of photos of their children sent directly to their phones. Not everyone is sold on the idea, however.

Conspiracy theories over Jeffrey Epstein's death will always move faster than evidence: expert

We discuss why the death of Jeffrey Epstein has spawned a rash of conspiracy theories. One expert tells us that while social media may have played a role in spreading the theories, the simple fact is that evidence moves slowly, and chatter moves fast.

The Current for August 16, 2019

Today on The Current: Why the death of Jeffrey Epstein has spawned a rash of conspiracy theories; plus, we speak to an author who says mosquitoes are humanity’s deadliest predator, even implicated in the rise and fall of an empire; and we listen to Episode 5 of CBC podcast Finding Cleo.

Conservatives may not win new voters, but will use SNC-Lavalin ethics report to galvanize base: pollster

Our national affairs panel weighs in on the ethics commissioner's findings on the SNC-Lavalin affair. As party leaders line up to condemn the prime minister, we explore how different parties will try to leverage the report ahead of the federal election.

Google Earth project about Indigenous languages feels like 'tourism,' scholar says

A new Google Earth project aims to celebrate Indigenous languages, but Canadian scholar Jennifer Wemigwans is less than impressed. She tells us why we need better tools to preserve and revitalize endangered tongues.

The Current for August 15, 2019

Today on The Current: Our national affairs panel discusses how the ethics report into the SNC-Lavalin affair will affect the federal election; plus, we look at a Google Earth project to celebrate Indigenous languages, and whether it could be doing more to preserve them; and we listen to Episode 4 of CBC podcast Finding Cleo.

The Current for August 14, 2019

Today on The Current: We look at summer camps that are deploying facial recognition technology to send anxious parents image of their unsuspecting kids; plus we continue with CBC original podcast Finding Cleo, about a Cree family's search for their sister lost in the Sixties Scoop — and presumed murdered.

Chinese intervention in Hong Kong protests could change the region 'as we know it': former diplomat

As protests close Hong Kong airport for a second day, we explore how the unrest is being portrayed in mainland China. We speak to an activist in Canada, and a former diplomat who warns that an intervention could be on the table.

The Current for August 13, 2019

Today on The Current: We explore how protests in Hong Kong are being portrayed in China, as the unrest closes the airport for a second day; plus, we look at what Bianca Andreescu’s win means for her future, and future generations of Canadian tennis players; and we continue with CBC original podcast Finding Cleo, about a Cree family's search for their sister lost in the Sixties Scoop — and presumed murdered.

This filmmaker wanted to help people get over their Islamophobia. So he offered them a free trip to Egypt

Canadian-Egyptian Tarek Mounib wanted Islamophobes in the U.S. to explore what drove their prejudice, so he offered them a free trip to Egypt. We talk to the filmmaker, and a woman who took him up on his offer.

The Current for August 12, 2019

Today on The Current: We discuss the situation in Kashmir, talking to people with family caught up in the political tensions; plus, we speak to a Canadian-Egyptian who invited a group of U.S. Islamophobes to explore their own prejudice — with a free trip to Egypt; and we listen to Episode 1 of CBC podcast Finding Cleo.

How Canadian farmers are 'leading the front' on sustainable agriculture to protect food stability

In the wake of a damning UN-backed report about the links between climate change, land use and food resources, Megz Reynolds says Canadian farmers are "leading the front" on sustainable agriculture practices that curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Canada's oldest nudist club is marking its 80th anniversary

Birthday suits of all shapes and sizes will be on display Saturday as Canada's oldest nudist club marks its 80th anniversary in Vancouver.