The180·The 180

Why I named my son Jayne

Meagan Botterill, a mother and blogger in Thunder Bay, Ontario, explains the motivations, and subsequent complications, of naming her son Jayne.
Jayne Botteril's mother says her son's name often sparks comments and questions of concern. (provided )
Listen3:50

Two and a half years ago, when Meagan Botterill's son was born, she named him Jayne.

Ever since then, she's faced questions:

"Why would you do that to him?"
"What does your husband think of this?"
"Have you thought about what it'll be like for him in school?"

Botteril notes the comments have always come from adults, not other children. 
Meagan Botterill is a blogger in Thunder Bay, Ontario. (Meagan Botterill)

"When Jayne was a baby, we took part in the Roots of Empathy program. It uses a family (baby and caregiver) to teach empathy, understanding, acceptance and has been a proven anti-bullying program across the world. In the class of grade one and grade two kids we visited monthly, not one questioned why my baby boy had the same name as a girl in the class. He was just baby Jayne."

To Botterill, the comments and questions from other adults reveals their assumptions about gender.

"When people imply that our son will be hurt because of his name, they do so because they have been trained to think of femininity as inferior to masculinity. That to be feminine is to be considered weak." 
 

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