The180

OPINION: Don't mistake pundits for partisans

With the policy jabs from opponents and venom from social media, the campaign trail can be an unkind place for federal candidates -- and for reporters. Edmonton Journal columnist Paula Simons says that when partisans can't distinguish the pundits from their foes, something has gone terribly wrong.
Party leaders Elizabeth May, Green Party, , left to right, Justin Trudeau, Liberal Party, Thomas Mulcair, NDP, and Stephen Harper, Conservative Party talk prior to the first leaders' debate Thursday, August 6, 2015 in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn (Frank Gunn/Canadian Press)
Listen2:37

With the policy jabs from opponents, door slams from constituents, and venom from social media, the campaign trail can be a very unkind place for federal candidates. And it's not always a happy time for the folks who have to cover the whole mess, either. 

Edmonton Journal columnist Paula Simons says that when partisans can't distinguish the pundits from their foes, something has gone terribly wrong.

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