The180

Political fact checking is polarizing society, economic analyses aren't economically sound, and vaping is ok

This week: producer Manusha Janakiram delves into the unintended consequences of political fact-checking, economist Trevor Toombe explains why he's skeptical of economic impact analyses, and the executive director of B.C's Centre for Disease Control argues against the move to regulate e-cigarettes
A group of Hofstra University students stand in front of a CNN trailer with images of Hillary Clinton, 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, and Donald Trump, 2016 Republican presidential nominee, ahead of the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., on Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Clinton and Trump will face each other, and likely a record television audience, in the first general election debate of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign on Monday. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg (Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg)
Listen to the full episode54:00

This week: producer Manusha Janakiram delves into the unintended consequences of political fact-checking, economist Trevor Toombe explains why he's skeptical of economic impact analyses, and the executive director of B.C's Centre for Disease Control argues against the move to regulate e-cigarettes