Tapestry

"Take 'black' off your name because our people have suffered enough."

Mandisa Thomas is part of a miniscule minority: She is an African-American atheist living the the southern U.S.
Listen13:19

Mandisa Thomas is part of a minuscule minority: She is an African-American atheist living in the southern U.S. In surveys, most African-Americans say they believe -- with certainty -- that God exists.  

When Mandisa Thomas was growing up, in New York City, religion wasn't such a big deal. But when she moved to Atlanta: different story.

What she encountered in Georgia led her to start a support group called Black Non-Believers.

Thomas says her group is contacted by Christians, "praying for us, and (saying that) we just don't understand the will of God, and (telling us to) take 'black' off your name because our people have suffered enough."

She says her members often lie about their beliefs to family and friends, some even having two different Facebook pages: one for their believing audience, and one for the non-believers.

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