Tapestrywith Mary Hynes

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Top ten ways to get some rest: results from a world-wide study

Reading is the number one most restful activity, according to writer and broadcaster Claudia Hammond. Her book, The Art of Rest, reveals the activities - other than sleep - that can most help you relax - even if it’s something you struggle with.

Meet the Canadian hockey legend who defied danger to help Soviet Jews

Canadian hockey legend Sherry Bassin risked arrest by the KGB in the 1980s to deliver religious items to synagogue.

The Art of Rest & Smuggling Jewish religious items into the Soviet Union

Pairing science with psychology, Claudia Hammond wrote the book on rest - and why we need more of it. The previously untold story of Canadian hockey executive Sherry Bassin is recounted in a documentary by NPR's Gary Waleik.

How Instagram self-help gurus have become pseudo-spiritual leaders

Some self-help Instagram influencers evoke the feeling of televangelism of days past, says author Leigh Stein. She believes that there’s something religious going on in their comment sections that’s attracting millions of female followers, and yet, she feels that this brand of spirituality ultimately rings hollow.

'Normalizing who we are': TikTokers are showing Hollywood how to tell Muslim stories

After decades of harmful presentations of Muslims dominated the entertainment industry, TikTok is changing the narrative. Entertainment reporter, Anhar Karim, says TikTok has the authentic representations of Muslims that were missing from his own life.

Soundtrack for the Soul — The 2021 Edition

Our continuing series on music as a soothing source of company. Five guests share the songs accompanying them into 2021.

Party like it's 1656: The end of the pandemic should be a moment to celebrate says historian

Studying music and culture from the 17th and 18th centuries gave historian Keith Johnston a vision for how we could mark the end of the COVID-19 pandemic. Johnston says we can draw inspiration from a 10-day festival hosted in Naples at the end of the 1656 epidemic.

Insta-evangelism and Muslim TikTok: meaning making on social media

Some self-help Instagram influencers evoke the feeling of televangelism of days past, says author Leigh Stein. She believes that there’s something religious going on in their comment sections that’s attracting millions of female followers, and yet, she feels that this brand of spirituality ultimately rings hollow. After decades of harmful presentations of Muslims dominated the entertainment industry, TikTok is changing the narrative. Entertainment reporter, Anhar Karim, says TikTok has the authentic representations of Muslims that were missing from his own life.

When the pandemic hit this researcher turned to a 2,000 year old story — the Mahabharata

The Mahabharata is a 2,000 year old sacred text whose central message is “everyone dies.” And yet professor Arti Dhand has found it a place of solace through the pandemic.

Lessons from a war zone: How to emotionally survive and flourish in the pandemic

When COVID-19 struck, Aisha Ahmad recognized very few people around her had lived through a large-scale disaster. Despite being a professor of political science, she found herself acting as an online counsellor, sharing wisdom she earned living in conflict around the world.

Turning to the past for comfort in the present

Studying the culture of the 17th and 18th centuries gave historian Keith Johnston a vision for how we could mark the end of the COVID-19 pandemic. Johnston says we can draw inspiration from a 10-day festival hosted in Naples at the end of the 1656 epidemic. The Mahabharata is a 2,000 year old sacred text from India whose central message is “everyone dies.” And yet University of Toronto associate professor Arti Dhand has found it a place of solace through the horrors of the pandemic.

Protecting nature, act of faith: Muslim women are leading the charge on climate activism

Memona Hossain has spoken to dozens of Muslim women around the world whose faith inspires their work as leading climate activists. Her field, Applied Ecopsychology, helps explain people’s deeply personal connections to the earth, and Hossain says spirituality is a crucial element.

Soundtrack for the Soul — The 2021 Edition

We spoke to five Canadians who’ll be turning to music this darker-than-normal winter, to keep them inspired — and keep them company — in the new year. If you have a song and story to share, please send us an email: tapestry@cbc.ca.

How this woman reconnected with her Métis ancestry, and the land they live on

Jenna Vandal always knew she was Métis, but her family’s history was hidden from her. After years of hard work and dedication, she has reconnected with her heritage and the land, and found that the past contains a blueprint for reconciliation.

Shambhala sex abuse allegations go back to beginnings of spiritual group, says ex-member

Shambhala, the branch of Tibetan Buddhism headquartered in Canada, has long taught the virtue of "basic goodness." But a Tapestry special reveals the organization's history is full of allegations of sexual misconduct.

Women who find meaning and purpose on the land

You’re going to meet two women with profound connections to the land. Memona Hossain is a PhD student in Applied Ecopsychology. She has spoken to dozens of Muslim women around the world whose faith drives their work as climate activists. Jenna Vandal recounts the long, winding path to connecting with her Métis heritage.

A year into the pandemic, many Canadians are bored. That might be an opportunity

Philosopher Andreas Elpidorou says the widespread experience of boredom during the pandemic is far from dull. He believes taking a closer look at our boredom can help us craft a better life and a more just society.

When running is your language, you use it to carry the stories of your people

The fertile fields in Washington state provided Noé Alvarez a playground and a place to unwind, but they were a source of pain for migrant workers in his community who toiled for a better life. On an epic transnational run, Alvarez learned to carry the stories of others, made peace with his past and rewrote his family’s story.

Running against time

Writer Noé Alvarez on finding a new language in the act of running and how he uses it to carry the stories of his ancestors and come to terms with his own. Philosopher Andreas Elpidorou says the widespread experience of boredom during the pandemic is far from dull. He believes taking a closer look at our boredom can help us craft a better life and a more just society.

Basic Goodness - Episode 2

Episode Two looks at sexual abuse in spiritual communities from the perspective of survivors. It explores what tends to happen to survivors who speak out against their spiritual leaders and groundbreaking ways we can listen to abuse survivors who choose to remain silent.

Basic Goodness - Episode 1

Episode One looks at sexual abuse allegations that surfaced in the Shambhala Buddhist community and explores the power imbalances in guru-student relationships. We ask why this keeps happening in spiritual communities around the world and hear from Shambhala's board of directors.

The world is full of delight if you choose to see it

After spending a year keeping track of all the delightful things he encountered, poet Ross Gay published his insights in “The Book of Delights.” He says observing small joyful moments is a social and political act in a world that prefers proficiency.

Making visual art for people who are blind

Visual art was Taylor Katzel’s passion and he wanted to teach art for a career. But just before he started teacher’s college, he was struck by an unexpected condition that left him blind. In Luke Williams' doc Art-cessbility, Katzel tells his story and makes a trip to the AGO to discover how inclusive design — a paradigm which focuses on making art and design accessible to people with disabilities — could allow him to continue to explore and experience visual art.

He grew up with a strict code of honesty. It played havoc with his life

Michael Leviton grew up in a household where speaking your mind and being truthful were the highest virtues. But once he became an adult, Leviton couldn’t pass off his brazenness as being an eccentric child. He had to deal with the consequences of his truths.

The delight in what we see and what we can't

Discovering moments of delight and making art accessible.

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