Tapestry with Mary Hynes

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How K-pop band BTS is helping fans a world away navigate identity and hardship

The seven member boy band, who sing and rap mostly in Korean, share a coming of age story in their lyrics that has their fans thinking about representation, self-esteem and hope.

Watch the self-talk: The dangers of typecasting yourself

I’m a hard worker. He’s a sloth. I’m an introvert. She’s a social butterfly. It’s easy to label yourself and others. But writer Dan Brooks says typecasting yourself can curtail your life.

How COVID-19 lockdowns interrupted this introvert author's journey to extrovert

One introvert tells Tapestry how her journey to live life like an extrovert has been upended by the coronavirus pandemic, just as she had become skilled at the “whole leaving-the-house thing.”

Introverts in the pandemic

Introvert Jessica Pan reflects on her ‘nightmarish’ quest to live like an extrovert for a year. American freelance writer Dan Brooks cautions against typecasting yourself. And, a Moncton couple recommends a song for our Soundtrack for the Soul that made them “laugh out loud.”

Why is the world so beautiful? An Indigenous botanist on the spirit of life in everything

Robin Wall Kimmerer is an acclaimed botanist who blends her scientific studies with her Indigenous upbringing. She says there is much to be learned about how to interact respectfully with the earth, from the behaviour of plants.
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The Vatican refuses to bless same-sex unions. Some LGBTQ Catholics are staying anyway

Xorje Olivares looks for solace and hope from his church. Unfortunately for Xorje, his church is Catholic and he's gay. With a recent missive from the Vatican reiterating its refusal to bless same-sex unions, Xorje is disappointed, but he's also not about to leave.

LGBTQ Catholics and why they stay

Xorje Olivares looks for solace and hope from the Catholic church. However, he's gay and the formal church continues to identify same-sex unions as a sin. Olivares shares what a different vision of the capital-C church could look like. Plus, Jane Goodall, who is this year's Templeton Prize winner.
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We can't solve an unethical economy with personal boycotts, says Concordia prof

Zeynep Arsel is an associate professor of marketing at Concordia University in Montreal, and she says that though your refusal to eat meat or shop at Amazon might come from a personal, ethical place, it's wrong to put that burden on average people to solve nation-wide and international problems.

These men became dads to baby found abandoned at subway station

Danny Stewart was on his way to meet his partner, Pete Mercurio, for dinner when he happened upon a baby, bundled in a sweatshirt and abandoned at a New York subway station. Here’s how that started the pair’s unexpected journey to parenthood.

Working together to make a family and a better world

Danny Stewart was on his way to meet his partner for dinner when he happened upon a baby, bundled in a sweatshirt and abandoned at a New York subway station. That started him on a path to parenthood. Later, a Concordia professor explains why the world's biggest problems can't be solved by personal boycotts.

Why is it so hard to say goodbye?

Researcher Adam Mastroianni has found that conversations tend to last a length of time that makes no one happy. He says it’s ok to say to goodbye when you want a conversation to end — but why does that feel so difficult to admit?

How people of colour are working through family conversations about anti-Black racism

Conversations about race can be fraught in the best of circumstances. But what happens when you're trying to have that conversation with relatives who've experienced racism themselves?

City-wide playtime should be a post-pandemic goal says design critic

Post-pandemic, design critic Alexandra Lange wants to see city-wide, street-based events given priority. Children need the freedom to play safely this summer — and beyond.

Soundtrack for the Soul — The 2021 Edition

When Vancouver’s Jamie Lee released her debut jazz album at the beginning of 2020, she didn't know the pandemic would almost convince her to leave her music career behind.

How Jane Austen's writing reveals her spiritual side

Reverend Paula Hollingsworth, Chaplain at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, is the author of The Spirituality of Jane Austen. She outlines the evolution of faith in Jane Austen’s novels and her personal life.

Now might be the perfect time to start a months-long project. Here's why

Writer Amy Shearn is on a quest to better understand why we take on long-term projects and what keeps us going through the process.

Finding faith in creative acts

Reverend Paula Hollingsworth outlines the evolution of faith in Jane Austen’s novels and her personal life. And writer Amy Shearn, is on a quest to better understand why we take on long-term projects and what keeps us going through the process.

The struggle at home and things we miss

Conversations about race can be fraught in the best of circumstances. But what happens when you’re trying to have that conversation with relatives who’ve experienced racism themselves — and who still dish it out to others? When Vancouvers’s Jamie Lee released her debut jazz album at the beginning of 2020, she didn't know the pandemic would almost convince her to leave her music career behind.

We can learn a lot about music from birds, says composer

Composer and zoomusicologist Hollis Taylor said that she learned a lot about music from the pied butcherbird, showing her that humans are far from being the only ones with musical talent in the natural world.

Why the first thing you should do when the pandemic is over is karaoke

Karaoke is a health hazard right now, but writer Mel Woods longs for the nights singing on a bar’s stage. Woods believes that when the pandemic ends, karaoke would be a great way to celebrate the beginning of a new era.

Top ten ways to get some rest: results from a world-wide study

Reading is the number one most restful activity, according to writer and broadcaster Claudia Hammond. Her book, The Art of Rest, reveals the activities - other than sleep - that can most help you relax - even if it’s something you struggle with.

Let's sing

Karaoke is a health hazard right now, but writer Mel Woods longs for the nights singing on a bar’s stage. Woods believes that when the pandemic ends, karaoke would be a great way to celebrate the beginning of a new era. Composer and zoomusicologist Hollis Taylor said that she learned a lot about music from the pied butcherbird, showing her that humans are far from being the only ones with musical talent in the natural world.

Meet the Canadian hockey legend who defied danger to help Soviet Jews

Canadian hockey legend Sherry Bassin risked arrest by the KGB in the 1980s to deliver religious items to synagogue.

The Art of Rest & Smuggling Jewish religious items into the Soviet Union

Pairing science with psychology, Claudia Hammond wrote the book on rest - and why we need more of it. The previously untold story of Canadian hockey executive Sherry Bassin is recounted in a documentary by NPR's Gary Waleik.

How Instagram self-help gurus have become pseudo-spiritual leaders

Some self-help Instagram influencers evoke the feeling of televangelism of days past, says author Leigh Stein. She believes that there’s something religious going on in their comment sections that’s attracting millions of female followers, and yet, she feels that this brand of spirituality ultimately rings hollow.

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