Tai Asks Why

How else can we power the planet?

Nothing on our planet could function without pooower! Even though energy is all around us, harnessing that energy and turning it into power is a massive challenge. Powering our day-to-day lives makes up almost half of fossil fuel emissions, which is causing climate change! Tai tries to find out if there’s a better way to power the planet.

Fossil fuel emissions are really bad for our environment! What if we were to find another, greener way?

This week on the show, Tai asks: are there better ways to power our planet? (Larry MacDougal/The Canadian Press; Evan Aagaard/CBC)

Nothing on our planet could function without pooower! Even though energy is all around us, harnessing that energy and turning it into power is a massive challenge. Powering our day-to-day lives makes up almost half of fossil fuel emissions, which is causing climate change! Tai tries to find out if there's a better way to power the planet.

In this episode Tai talks to:

  • Richard Randell, engineer and PhD candidate at Stanford's Mechanical Engineering program

  • Daniel Ddiba, research associate at the Stockholm Environment Institute. He conducts research into how poop can be used as fuel for industries and other applications in African cities

  • Jim Green, chief scientist at NASA, who tells Tai how NASA's planning on providing power for future colonies on Mars, 140 million kilometres away.

Want to keep up with Tai Asks Why? Listen for free on your favourite podcast app.

 

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