The Sunday Magazine

Valentina & TSO; The myth of military intervention; Online namesake; Writing in the margins; Being responsible

Valentina vs. the TSO - Michael's essay: The Toronto Symphony's decision to cancel a concert by Valentina Lisitsa is just the latest clash between politics and classical music. Listener mail: Our listeners were not afraid to weigh in on the politics of fear, following our conversation with Penelope Ironstone of Wilfrid Laurier University. And mail in response to Michael's elegy for a city tree, keeps coming. The myth of military intervention: Now that Canada has taken the fight against ISIS into Syria, Paul Rogers of the University of Bradford illuminates with his usual bracing blend of history, wisdom and sharp analysis. Molly Segal meets her online namesake: Somewhere out there, there's another person with a totally different life who shares your name. Writing in the margins: Tim Parks believes we all should write on the pages of the books we are reading. Taking responsibility: When does diminished mental capacity become an excuse for a criminal act? Our guest is philosopher Nicole Vincent.

Valentina vs. the TSO - Michael's essay: (00:00:25)

The Toronto Symphony's decision to cancel a concert by Ukrainian pianist Valentina Lisitsa is just the latest clash between politics and classical music.

Does military intervention in the Middle East ever work? (00:04:34) Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya -- we in the West seem to have a hearty appetite for forcible regime change in the Middle East, with decidedly mixed results. Why do chaos and instability so often ensue when the West embarks on a military adventure in the Middle East? Now that Canada has taken the fight against ISIS into Syria, Paul Rogers, Professor of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford in the U.K., illuminates with his usual bracing blend of history, wisdom and sharp analysis.

Listener mail: (00:37:40) Our listeners were not afraid to weigh in on the politics of fear, following our conversation with Penelope Ironstone of Wilfrid Laurier University. Also, mail in response to Michael's elegy for a city tree keeps coming

Molly meets her Internet namesake - documentary: (00:47:55)  Admit it - you've looked too. Snooped and surfed the internet for the skinny on that other person with a totally different life who shares your name. Molly Segal went a step further. 

Writing in the margins: (00:56:17) It is drilled into us as children; never write notes on the pages of the book you are reading. Award-winning author Tim Parks disagrees. In fact, he believes we should write in our books -- for the benefit of all humankind! Tim Parks is the author of a blog called Where I'm Reading From: The Changing World of Books.

Taking responsibility: (01:17:39) When does diminished mental capacity become an excuse -- even an exoneration -- for a criminal act? And if chemical intervention can cure, or even enhance, a damaged brain, what are the implications?  Philosopher Nicole Vincent studies the complex landscape of the human brain, and its relationship to moral and legal responsibility. 

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