The Sunday Magazine

The Sunday Magazine for July 31, 2022

Young Indigenous leaders share their takes on the Pope's visit and the path forward, George Monbiot reimagines the future of food, and Azar Nafisi extolls the power of literature in troubled times.
Talia Schlanger is guest host of The Sunday Magazine. (David Spowart)

This week on The Sunday Magazine with guest host Talia Schlanger:

New generation of Indigenous leaders on what comes after the Pope's apology

During his trip to Canada this past week, Pope Francis apologized for members of the Catholic Church who cooperated with Canada's "devastating" policy of Indigenous residential schools, and begged for forgiveness for past wrongs and forced assimilation. Although he returns to the Vatican this weekend, the process of reconciliation continues. To discuss where that effort goes from here, members of a new generation of Indigenous leaders share their takes on the week that was and the path forward. Schlanger is joined by Taylor Behn-Tsakoza, Youth Representative at the British Columbia Assembly of First Nations; Serpent River First Nation Chief Brent Bisaillon; and Hailey Rose, Youth Representative at the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations.

During his trip to Canada this past week, Pope Francis apologized for members of the Catholic Church who cooperated with Canada's "devastating" policy of Indigenous residential schools, and begged for forgiveness for past wrongs and forced assimilation. Although he returns to the Vatican this weekend, the process of reconciliation continues. To discuss where that effort goes from here, members of a new generation of Indigenous leaders share their takes on the week that was and the path forward. Talia Schlanger is joined by Taylor Behn-Tsakoza, Youth Representative at the British Columbia Assembly of First Nations; Serpent River First Nation Chief Brent Bisaillon; and Hailey Rose, Youth Representative at the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations.

Reimagining the future of food

George Monbiot is challenging common practices and beliefs about farming and food production because he says the future of the climate crisis and global hunger depends on it. In his new book Regenesis: Feeding the World Without Devouring the Planet, the columnist for The Guardian makes an argument against animal farming while making a case for advancing the science of soil technology and bacteria pioneering. Schlanger speaks with Monbiot about how innovation and a reimagination of food might just save the living world.

George Monbiot is challenging common practices and beliefs about farming and food production because he says the future of the climate crisis and global hunger depends on it. In his new book Regenesis: Feeding The World Without Devouring The Planet, the columnist for The Guardian makes an argument against animal farming while making a case for advancing the science of soil technology and bacteria pioneering. Talia Schlanger speaks with Monbiot about how innovation and a reimagination of food might just save the living world.

Azar Nafisi on the power of literature to fight authoritarianism

Between international conflicts, political division, misinformation, rising anti-democratic forces, and a pandemic... it can be easy to feel overwhelmed by the latest news headlines. But the antidote to that hopelessness may be as close as your bookshelf or local library. So says Azar Nafisi, the acclaimed author who's perhaps best-known for her memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran. Her newest collection of essays Read Dangerously: The Subversive Power of Literature in Troubled Times is a reading list of sorts, written in the form of letters to her late father about the work of writers from Plato and Salman Rushdie, to Margaret Atwood and Ta-Nehisi Coates. We revisit Piya Chattopadhyay's conversation with Nafisi about why she turned to them for inspiration, as she struggled to make sense of the rise of authoritarianism around the world.

Between international conflicts, political division, misinformation, rising anti-democratic forces, and a pandemic... it can be easy to feel overwhelmed by the latest news headlines. But the antidote to that hopelessness may be as close as your bookshelf or local library. So says Azar Nafisi, the acclaimed author who's perhaps best-known for her memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran. Her new collection of essays Read Dangerously: The Subversive Power of Literature in Troubled Times is a reading list of sorts, written in the form of letters to her late father about the work of writers from Plato and Salman Rushdie, to Margaret Atwood and Ta-Nehisi Coates. Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Nafisi about why she turned to them for inspiration, as she struggled to make sense of the rise of authoritarianism around the world.

Podcast | The Flamethrowers, Episode 5: The Rage Industry

Hosted by Justin Ling, the CBC original podcast The Flamethrowers tracks the rise of American right wing radio from fringe preachers and conspiracy peddlers of the 1930s… to the political firestorm that rages today. In Episode Five, right-wing radio hosts find their greatest foe in Barack Obama. As they try to take him down at every turn, they find the perfect formula to manufacture outrage.


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