The Sunday Magazine

The Sunday Magazine for July 25, 2021

Haitian-American historian Marlene Daut discusses Haiti's history, tracing a direct line from the Haitian Revolution of 1804 to today's unrest, and asks who bears responsibility for that unrest. We also revisit our conversation with journalist James Nestor about the science and history of breathing. He shares some simple ways to improve yours — a subject that's become even more relevant lately.
Rachel Giese is guest host of The Sunday Magazine. (Angela Lewis)

This week on The Sunday Magazine with guest host Rachel Giese:

What is next for Haiti? 

When Haitian president Jovenel Moise was shot dead in his home earlier this month, the beleaguered nation once again made headlines for its current political and social turmoil. But this time, Haitian-American historian Marlene Daut is imploring the international community to look beyond the usual tropes, to the centuries of occupation, intervention, and forced indemnity the country and its people have endured. She takes guest host Rachel Giese all the way back through the republic's history, tracing a direct line from the Haitian Revolution of 1804 to today's unrest, and asks who bears responsibility for that unrest, and what they owe Haitians working for a more stable future. 

How we breathe has major impacts on our body — James Nestor has recommendations to improve it

With air quality compromised around the country due to forest fires, many of us are thinking about the air we breathe. But what you may not know is, how we breathe also has an impact on our health. We do it 25,000 times a day… and barely even think about it. But there's a lost science and art to breathing, and rediscovering it can do wonders for your physical health, and overall well being.  That's what journalist James Nestor discovered in his deep dive into the science and history of breathing.  He talks to host Piya Chattopadhyay all about breathing, and shares some simple ways to improve yours.  


now