The Sunday Magazine

The Sunday Magazine for February 20, 2022

We explore where extremism in Canada is heading, Sheila Heti talks about her new novel Pure Colour, Stephen Poloz projects uncertainty as the new normal, and Daniel Jones surveys how the pandemic's changed our relationships.
David Common is the guest host of The Sunday Magazine. (CBC)

This week on The Sunday Magazine with guest host David Common:

Where extremism in Canada goes from here

The Ottawa protests and border blockades put a spotlight on extremism in Canada – one that experts who track extremist groups and work to counter them say is long overdue. Common speaks with Ottawa resident Zexi Li who is leading the class action against the protesters, to give her reaction to the events over the past two days, and to talk about the questions she has going forward. Following this, David speaks to Barbara Perry, the director of Ontario Tech University's Centre on Hate, Bias and Extremism in Oshawa, Ont.; Étienne Quintal, an online hate researcher at the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre; and National Council of Canadian Muslims CEO Mustafa Farooq about the groups behind the protests, the line between populism and extremism, the state of counter-extremism efforts, and what needs to happen now that police are moving in and arrests are being made.

Former Bank of Canada governor says uncertain times are here to stay

Stephen Poloz says rising inequality – or the perception of it – is one of the forces driving protests in Canada. Poloz served as governor of the Bank of Canada from 2013 to 2020. In his new book The Next Age of Uncertainty: How the World can Adapt to a Riskier Future, he lays out the "tectonic" forces that have plunged us into this period. As Poloz tells Common, growing debt, climate change, an aging population, new technology, and rising inequality – along with the global pandemic – mean volatility is the "new normal."

Modern Love editor Daniel Jones reflects on romance and connection in the age of COVID-19

Daniel Jones is the long-time editor of the New York Times' popular Modern Love column, which receives more than 10,000 submissions from the public each year. He looks back on two years' worth of essays to provide a survey of how the pandemic has reshaped our attitudes toward companionship, and what they reveal about love and connection in the age of COVID-19.

In Pure Colour, writer Sheila Heti uses humour to tackle the challenges of modern life

In her new novel Pure Colour, Canadian author Sheila Heti explores the idea that the world is an unfinished work of art, whose creator is getting ready to scrap and start over... because the first draft just didn't cut it. Common speaks with Heti about the book's themes of grief, climate change and the human condition, along with the personal loss that shaped its narrative.


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