The Sunday Magazine

The Sunday Magazine for December 27, 2020

Guest host David Common speaks with environmental historian Bathsheba Demuth about the concept of "shifting baselines," and 3 senior citizens talk about their experiences during the pandemic. Plus, Canadian writer and environmental historian Jessica J. Lee talks about her memoir Two Trees Make a Forest and sports reporter Doug Smith discusses 25 years of the Toronto Raptors.
(CBC)

This week on The Sunday Magazine with guest host David Common:

How we remember the past while adapting to a new normal

2020 has been an abnormal year. It's introduced sweeping changes to the rhythms and routines of our daily lives. But, the speed at which we humans adapt can be both a blessing and a curse. That's something environmental historian Bathsheba Demuth knows well. When Demuth contracted COVID-19, she didn't realise that the symptoms would linger on for months — also known as "long COVID." Demuth explores the dangers of adapting too quickly and forgetting what "healthy" felt like — both in terms of the pandemic and climate change. 

2020 has been an abnormal year. It's introduced sweeping changes to the rhythms and routines of our daily lives. But, the speed at which we humans adapt can be both a blessing and a curse. That's something environmental historian Bathsheba Demuth knows well. When Demuth contracted COVID-19, she didn't realise that the symptoms would linger on for months — also known as "long COVID." Demuth explores the dangers of adapting too quickly and forgetting what "healthy" felt like — both in terms of the pandemic and climate change. 18:02

What senior citizens can tell us about 2020

Loneliness, grief and resilience are regular themes that emerge from 2020. These themes are especially pertinent for those most vulnerable in our society. We speak to a panel of senior citizens who share these two things — they're in their 70s and they're living alone. As part of a end-of-year panel conversation, Common hears from these seniors located across Canada about their experiences of this year. 

Loneliness, grief and resilience are regular themes that emerge from 2020. These themes are especially pertinent for those most vulnerable in our society. We speak to a panel of senior citizens who share these two things — they're in their 70s and they're living alone. As part of a end-of-year panel conversation, Common hears from these seniors located across Canada about their experiences of this year. 24:33

Plus, we revisit conversations from earlier in the year with regular host Piya Chattopadhyay: 

A family's turbulent history in Taiwan's lush landscape

In her memoir Two Trees Make a Forest, Canadian writer and environmental historian Jessica J. Lee returns to her mother's homeland of Taiwan to understand the landscape that shaped her family — and in turn, shapes her. The book intertwines her grandparents' histories, the political history of Taiwan and the island's geological history. She speaks with Chattopadhyay about home, multiplicity and belonging.

In her memoir Two Trees Make a Forest, Canadian writer and environmental historian Jessica J. Lee returns to her mother's homeland of Taiwan to understand the landscape that shaped her family - and in turn, shapes her. The book intertwines her grandparents' histories, the political history of Taiwan and the island's geological history. She speaks with Chattopadhyay about home, multiplicity and belonging. For more, visit: www.cbc.ca/1.5729728 27:16

25 years of the Toronto Raptors

Doug Smith has covered the Toronto Raptors for the Toronto Star since the team was founded in 1995. He speaks with Chattopadhyay about his book reflecting on that journey, We the North, how the Canadian expansion team came to be crowned NBA champions and how the Raps have helped shape and reflect contemporary Canada.

Note: Audio of this episode's stories will be available on Sunday afternoon.

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