The Sunday Magazine

A Canadian family's struggle over China's one-child policy

For 25 years, the Chinese government enforced a much-loathed law dictating that families could have only one child. Lu Zhou says its repercussions continue to reverberate through generations, and across oceans and borders.
This photograph taken on December 15, 2016, shows medical staff massaging babies at an infant care centre in Yongquan, in Chongqing municipality, in southwest China. China had one million more births in 2016 than in 2015, following the end of the one-child policy at the end of 2015. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

It has been just over a year since China abolished its much loathed one-child policy.

Between 1979 and 2014 it shaped and distorted the lives of many Chinese families. And its impact reverberates through generations and across oceans and borders.

Lu Zhou says its repercussions continue to reverberate through generations, and across oceans and borders.

Click the button above to hear Lu Zhou's essay. 

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