The Sunday Magazine

Andrew Solomon: Stigmatizing the mentally ill

Andrew Solomon is not your typical depressive, if there is such a thing. Most people struggling with clinical depression do not like to talk about it, because of the stigma that clings to the disease. Many people still see depression as a sign of weakness. They believe if you just pulled yourself together ...  had a better attitude ... you'd...
Andrew Solomon is not your typical depressive, if there is such a thing. Most people struggling with clinical depression do not like to talk about it, because of the stigma that clings to the disease. Many people still see depression as a sign of weakness. They believe if you just pulled yourself together ...  had a better attitude ... you'd feel better. 

Mr. Solomon has heard this wrong-headed chatter most of his life. But rather than shy away from it, the journalist and best-selling author wrote a book detailing his own struggles with depression. It's called "The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression".

He has become a vocal advocate for more progressive attitudes about depression, so that sufferers can step out of the shadows, and get the help they need.

So it was with some shock and dismay, that Mr. Solomon learned about Ellen Richardson, the Canadian who was turned back at the U.S. border recently because she had been hospitalized for depression.

Andrew Solomon wrote about the incident in the New York Times, and talked about his concerns with Michael Enright.

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