The Sunday Magazine

Losing Gordie Howe and Muhammad Ali; Rachel Notley; Broken escalator phenomenon; James Joyce

Gordie Howe and Muhammad Ali took part of my childhood with them when they died - Michael's essay: Here's an excerpt: "Losing Muhammad Ali and Gordie Howe in the same week feels as if an important element of my youth has been amputated, whisked away, leaving behind misted dreams and fading images." Rachel Notley on Fort McMurray, climate change, and Alberta's financial woes: Premier Rachel Notley has had something of an "annus horribilus." Just over a year ago, she shocked the country when the NDP swept to power with promises to create jobs and wean the province of its dependence on oil and gas revenue. Then the price of oil collapsed, 120,000 Albertans lost their jobs, and a devastating wildfire forced 90,000 people from their homes. She is Michael's guest for a feature interview. Yes, It's A Thing: Why is it so unnerving to walk up or down a broken escalator? Dr. Raymond Reynolds lectures on the subject of motor control at the University of Birmingham, and has studied "Broken Escalator Phenomenon." A celebration of the life and literature of James Joyce: James Joyce exploded the way we think about language, literature, and the world we live in. His writing has been claimed by the academy, but it celebrated ordinary people and the joys of everyday life. Bloomsday — the annual commemoration of the day-long journey around Dublin taken by Leopold Bloom, the protagonist in Joyce's novel, Ulysses — takes place every June 16th. This year, there's even more to celebrate. Joyce's first novel, A Portrait of The Artist as a Young Man, was published 100 years ago. Music this week by: Maria Dunn, the Fretless, the Chieftains, Oscar Peterson and Dave Young, I Musici de Montreal conducted by Yuli Turovsky, and the McDades.

Gordie Howe and Muhammad Ali took part of my childhood with them when they died - Michael's essay: Here's an excerpt: "Losing Muhammad Ali and Gordie Howe in the same week feels as if an important element of my youth has been amputated, whisked away, leaving behind misted dreams and fading images."

Rachel Notley's Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Year:  Premier Rachel Notley has had something of an "annus horribilus." Just over a year ago, she shocked the country when the NDP swept to power with promises to create jobs and wean the province of its dependence on oil and gas revenue. Then the price of oil collapsed, 120,000 Albertans lost their jobs, and a devastating wildfire forced 90,000 people from their homes. As the Alberta NDP meet in Calgary. Premier Notley stops by our studio for a feature interview.

Yes, It's A Thing: Why is it so unnerving to walk up or down a broken escalator?  Dr. Raymond Reynolds lectures on the subject of motor control at the University of Birmingham, and has studied "Broken Escalator Phenomenon." 

A celebration of the life and literature of James Joyce: James Joyce exploded the way we think about language, literature, and the world we live in. His writing has been claimed by the academy, but it celebrated ordinary people and the joys of everyday life. Bloomsday — the annual commemoration of the day-long journey around Dublin taken by Leopold Bloom, the protagonist in Joyce's novel, Ulysses — takes place every June 16th. This year, there's even more to celebrate. Joyce's first novel, A Portrait of The Artist as a Young Man, was published 100 years ago. 

Music this week by: Maria Dunn, the Fretless, the Chieftains, Oscar Peterson and Dave Young, I Musici de Montreal conducted by Yuli Turovsky, and the McDades.

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