The Sunday Magazine

Jimmy Breslin's journalism; Davd Grossman, Bob Robertson, The teenage taxidermist, Robert Harris

How Jimmy Breslin changed journalism -- Michael's essay: Breslin was the best practitioner of what was called, "The New Journalism" -- using the techniques of fiction to tell the stories of the poor, the working class and the underclass. 'Laughter is a good way to breathe again' -- David Grossman on using comedy to deal with tragedy: The hero of Israeli writer David Grossman's latest novel, A Horse Walks Into a Bar, is a tortured stand-up comedian. Remembering Double Exposure's Bob Robertson: Robertson, who died earlier this week at the age of 71, was not only a brilliant satiric writer -- he was a spot-on, hilarious impersonator of Canadian politicians such as former Prime Ministers Joe Clark and Jean Chrétien. Meet the 15-year-old taxidermist turning roadkill into art: Tristan Meyer Odell is an animal lover who stores carcasses in his bedroom freezer. His mother is a big supporter of his new passion for taxidermy. Rachel Matlow's documentary is called, you guessed it, "The Teenage Taxidermist." Robert Harris with Episode 3 of "The Music That Changed Your World": Michael's world was changed by his teenaged encounter with "Classical Music For People Who Hate Classical Music", an LP by Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops. Robert also plays excerpts from a strange but delightful classical music sampler LP known simply as "The Numbers." 'Greed is murder' -- Michael Enright's 2004 interview with Jimmy Breslin about the Catholic Church: Breslin had just published The Church that Forgot Christ, about the child sexual abuse scandal. He had very publicly left the church and was white-hot with anger. Music this week by: Linda Carone, Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, and a panoply of spring-like melodies from Antonio Vivaldi played by Les Voix Humaines, Janina Fialkowska, the Fraser MacPherson Quartet and the Canadian Jazz Quartet.

How Jimmy Breslin changed journalism -- Michael's essay: Breslin was the best practitioner of what was called, "The New Journalism" -- using the techniques of fiction to tell the stories of the poor, the working class and the underclass. 

'Laughter is a good way to breathe again' -- David Grossman on using comedy to deal with tragedy: The hero of Israeli writer David Grossman's latest novel, A Horse Walks Into a Bar, is a tortured stand-up comedian.

Remembering Double Exposure's Bob Robertson: Robertson, who died earlier this week at the age of 71, was not only a brilliant satiric writer -- he was a spot-on, hilarious impersonator of Canadian politicians such as former Prime Ministers Joe Clark and Jean Chrétien.

Meet the 15-year-old taxidermist turning roadkill into art:  Tristan Meyer Odell is an animal lover who stores carcasses in his bedroom freezer. His mother is a big supporter of his new passion for taxidermy. Rachel Matlow's documentary is called, you guessed it, "The Teenage Taxidermist."

Robert Harris with Episode 3 of "The Music That Changed Your World": Michael's world was changed by his teenaged encounter with "Classical Music For People Who Hate Classical Music", an LP by Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops. Robert also plays excerpts from a strange but delightful classical music sampler LP known simply as "The Numbers."

'Greed is murder' -- Michael Enright's 2004 interview with Jimmy Breslin about the Catholic Church: Breslin had just published The Church that Forgot Christ, about the child sexual abuse scandal. He had very publicly left the church and was white-hot with anger.

Music this week by: Linda Carone, Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, and a panoply of spring-like melodies from Antonio Vivaldi played by Les Voix Humaines, Janina Fialkowska, the Fraser MacPherson Quartet and the Canadian Jazz Quartet.

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