The Sunday Magazine

Documentary: The Golden Rule

A Disability activist fights for right to manage his own care.You can't miss Paul Caune in a meeting. What you see is a man in a wheelchair, all but immobile.  His tracheotomy hose leads from his throat to the ventilator on the back of his chair....
A Disability activist fights for right to manage his own care.

You can't miss Paul Caune in a meeting.  What you see is a man in a wheelchair, all but immobile.  His tracheotomy hose leads from his throat to the ventilator on the back of his chair.

What you hear is a take-no-prisoners fighter - a man using the force of his own experience to make a case.

He will tell anyone that most politicians and health care bureaucrats are from "planet clueless", when it comes to the rights of people with disabilities, and that it's time to do something about it.

Civil-Rights-Now-200.jpg
Paul Caune, Adrian Dix and
Josh Vander Vies.
Caune and his cohorts call themselves, Civil Rights Now. They want self-determination  - the right to manage their own care,  make their own decisions.

In 2005, Paul Caune's life changed dramatically, when he took on Lion's Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.

He was 36, a patient there. His disability had escalated and the group home where he'd lived before wouldn't - couldn't - take him back. The Health Authority told him he couldn't stay in the hospital either. He would have to live the rest of his life in BC's long term care institution - the George Pearson Centre.  

Paul Caune was having none of it.

Karin Wells's
documentary is called "The Golden Rule."

Listen to the documentary and then watch the film Paul Caune Produced, Hope Is Not A Plan.

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